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Subject: Implementing Parking permits
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Author Messages
JeffT
(Maryland)

Posts:83


05/18/2020 7:47 AM  
I am looking for input on implementing parking permits.

1) Do you assign a parking permit to each individual car or to the unit owner for x number of spaces to use on any car?

2) What kind of permit identification do you require or give to the owner to display on car. Sticker, Hanger, etc.
CathyA3
(Ohio)

Posts:1068


05/18/2020 10:09 AM  
We debated doing something like this. However, as we worked through the process, we quickly decided that the cost involved - in time, money and aggravation - far outweighed any benefit provided. One of the things we discovered is that you need someone on site to handle issues as they occur, and we do not have an on site manager. This last item was a deal breaker for us.

But your mileage may vary (ha!). A lot of it depends on your parking restriction, the layout of the community, the availability of parking, the habits of the residents and visitors, and whether you have a PM who can handle it.
SheliaH
(Indiana)

Posts:3304


05/18/2020 10:47 AM  
We have numbered spaces for most of the units - 1 per unit (some of the townhouses like mine, have one car garages). A few years ago we issued permits for each unit and passed them out. It was up to the homeowner to put the permit in whatever car he/she wanted. At first, we had a tow trucking company drive through to haul off cars that were in those spaces without any permit whatsoever - long story, but it didn't go as well as we wanted, so we stopped.

On the other hand, it did cut down the number of complaints we received. We have security officers (off duty cops), but they don't monitor who's in what parking space - people have to contact them if they have concerns. They will take action if the car is inoperable and has sat there for weeks, missing current registration, parked in front of a fire hydrant, etc. Those are the county rules, which we've adopted as community rules.

Homeowners can also call any towing company and have the car removed - and deal with the ensuing fallout
If they sell the house, it's up to them to forward the pass to the new owner, and if they rent out the unit (many do), they're also responsible for giving the pass to the tenant and collecting it when they move out. Lost or stolen tags can be replaced for a fee.
ND
(PA)

Posts:457


05/18/2020 11:24 AM  
CathyA3's advice is good.

Implementing parking permits, stickers, spots, restrictions, etc. where they didn't previously exist may bring greater issues than whatever currently exists in regard to your parking situation.

Explain a bit what the current issues are, why you're trying to do this, what your neighborhood is like (in terms of streets/parkings), who owns the location where people part (lot, street, public, private), and if you have an MC.

There may be other ideas/solutions to assist with the issues you are encountering.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:9569


05/18/2020 11:51 AM  
Posted By JeffT on 05/18/2020 7:47 AM
I am looking for input on implementing parking permits.

1) Do you assign a parking permit to each individual car or to the unit owner for x number of spaces to use on any car?

2) What kind of permit identification do you require or give to the owner to display on car. Sticker, Hanger, etc.




Why needed?
DeidreB
(Virginia)

Posts:97


05/18/2020 12:06 PM  
Reiterating points made by others. It all depends. First and main point is what do the CCRs say about parking? Are residents parking in visitor parking or are outside people parking in resident spots? Have CCR parking restrictions ever been enforced? How long has it not been enforced? While parking issues are common, no two communities are exactly alike when it comes to parking issues. Options range from a slow ramp up to doing nothing to opting for a communications campaign only to deferring to local municipality parking enforcement to using parking enforcement apps or permit stickers or hangers. Also, how much clamor for change is there? Sudden changes are often met with resistance.
JeffT
(Maryland)

Posts:83


05/19/2020 8:59 AM  
There has been an increase in about complaints for parking spots. The associations owns the streets and parking spaces with in the community. There are less parking spaces than there are units. Each unit has a driveway and a garage. Some driveways are large enough to hold 2 cars and some only one. Some owners have 4 cars and some only 1 or 2. some are rentals that have several roommates and each have a car. So the number of cars per unit vary widely for various reasons.

Current docs say that parking spaces are for all and their guests. We are in the middle of re-writing the by-laws and want o include something about allowing the BOD adopt parking policies should they want to or in some case to ban delinquent owner for using the parking spaces.

That being said. We are just exploring the idea of assigned parking spaces. But would be difficult since there are less parking spaces than units. The other drawback was figure out how to issue parking passes and to who, if even worth it.

Just in the idea phase of how to handle limited parking and passes were brought up.
SheliaH
(Indiana)

Posts:3304


05/19/2020 10:54 AM  
There will NEVER be enough parking for everyone, so that's the first thing you need to understand and accept. Society has gone from no cars at all to one-car families, then two, and now it's not unusual to see three and four-car homes - one of my co-workers has SIX. Cars are also larger than they used to be, and then you have to add the SUVs, vans, and pick up trucks that seem to be the sons and daughters of monster trucks, leaving less space for everyone. Oh, you also have to keep handicapped car owners in mind, especially the ones with modified vans that will need two spaces - one for the van and the other to wheel themselves in and out.

Developers never plan for ample parking because no one really knows what that means, and besides, they're more interested in building as many houses as possible on the land. They're long gone by the time all the homeowners show up, all with 2+ cars to store - not their problem.

So...assigned parking spaces could work. If there's an old community map somewhere, take a look at it to see how many parking spaces are available - that can help with planning how many passes you'll need to give out. You may also want to designate some areas for the visitors so they can stay out of the resident space.

If your community is similar to mine, you may have to say every home gets 1 pass and that's it - the household members will need to fight among themselves who gets it. Unfortunately, you can't turn back time to add more parking, and people may have no choice but to deal with what's there. Especially the folks who rent - they should be telling their tenants only X number of spots are available, so it may be someone's going to have to live elsewhere or play musical chairs with the garage and driveway.

Finally, there are people who want to convert their garages into rooms - DON'T ALLOW THIS if your documents allow you to make that rule. In my community there are two homes on my street where this happened - our former president did it, and he once commented he knew that would knock off $5K or so off the value of his home, but oh, well. If people start that kind of conversion, your parking problem will get worse.
ND
(PA)

Posts:457


05/19/2020 10:56 AM  
Your primary issue that would make the idea of assigned spaces a non-starter for me is that there is no way to equitably distribute spaces since there are fewer spaces than units. For that reason alone, I wouldn't proceed.

If you decided to proceed with this idea, I guarantee it would be a constant task and headache for the Board, Management Company, homeowners, towing company, etc.

- homeowners change frequently.
- vehicles change frequently.
- tenants change frequently.
- permits/passes get lost, stolen, discarded.
- homeowners can't have a party or guests where additional vehicles come into the neighborhood.
- vehicles may be damaged when towed.
- Etc.

It doesn't make sense to me to implement and continuously maintain a massively laborious system in order to appease a few homeowners who might be unhappy that a neighbor's vehicle is parked in front of their home.

I think you'll create even more discord in the neighborhood than you have right now. Rather than all spaces being owned collectively by the HOA for the use/benefit of all, each parking spaces will be allocated to a specific owner and the owners will be possessive of that space when they weren't (or shouldn't have been) previously.

Additionally your by-laws isn't the place for parking rules . . . I believe this would need to be in a separate rules & regs document (if covenants permit Board to establish parking rules) or in your covenants (by way of appropriately approved amendment to the ).

Perhaps survey the entire community and see what the data indicates as far as # owners for/against assigning spaces. Real data of the population should guide your decision on this, not (what I believe) is the more vocal minority.
ND
(PA)

Posts:457


05/19/2020 11:07 AM  
I meant to add . . .
For now, I would just continuously encourage all owners to be considerate of where they and their guests park, and for how long. Remind everyone that the available parking belongs to everyone and needs to be shared.
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