Get 1 year of free community web site hosting from Community123.com!
Monday, December 06, 2021











HOATalk is a free service of Community123.com:

Easy to use website tools to help your board
Only members have access to all features.
Click here to join HOATalk for Free! Members click here to login and access all features.
Subject: Disadvantages of Sheds
Prev Next
Please login to post a reply (click Member Login on the menu).
Author Messages
BarbaraB5
(Illinois)

Posts:5


02/18/2008 8:25 AM  
I am a relatively new member of our BOD and I'd like some input from some of the seasoned BOD on the subject of sheds and the disadvantages of having them. Right now, our HOA does not allow them and I, personally, hope they never allow them, but half of our community would like to see an amendment regarding sheds.
I'd like to present them with some solid knowledge of why sheds aren't advisable. Some arguments to the contrary are: (1) they don't devalue property, (2) they don't attract rodents, etc., (3)they won't be left unmaintained, etc.
Please help with as much info as you have on this subject and I thank you in advance.
BrianB
(California)

Posts:2820


02/18/2008 8:45 AM  
i too would be interested, but from the other side. Is it your contention that the building of a shed attracts rodents somehow? That if i normally maintain my home and property, that once a shed is built, i will stop?

I always thought that the poor storage of a food source/water source attracted rodents, not the structure itself, for example.
HaroldS
(Arizona)

Posts:906


02/18/2008 9:39 AM  
Well, what is your objection to sheds? And your alternative to sheds? There should be firm arch guidelines for construction. Where would you have us put all that "stuff"? In the garage and park the vehicles in the driveway or street?
I would much rather look at a nice ARC approved shed than multiple vehicles. We had to dig out a slight depression in order to install a flat roof shed out of sight behind our 6' fence. But still use 1/3 of the 3 car garage for storage, with out 2 vehicles in the other bays. With no cellars or attics (at least in Arizona) where do you propose we store Christmas stuff? Garden tools and mowers? Our children's stuff while they find themselves? Etc. Etc. Etc.
SidneyP
(Florida)

Posts:302


02/18/2008 9:39 AM  
I believe if there are codes of what kind of shed can be built, a shed is a plus. If all outside maintenance is done by the association a shed will not be necessary. If you live in a HOA where the HO cuts and cares for their own yard, IMO a shed is necessary....I have read many post which want cars parked in the garage...with a mower, weedeater, lawn chairs, gas cans, etc placed in the garage there is no room for the car(s)....Our association allows sheds but have not enforced the code, so we do have some ugly metal rusting ones. We had ours build on site out of wood and it is very nice with windows and flower boxes at the windows. It was a necessity, here in Flordia we also have a generator to store. These things need some place to go.
HaroldS
(Arizona)

Posts:906


02/18/2008 9:40 AM  
oops. Should be with OUR two vehicles in the other two bays.
PaulM
(Pennsylvania)

Posts:1347


02/18/2008 9:52 AM  
BarbaraB5: You will need to determine IF when you state the HOA does not allow them, you mean the official documents actually restrict installation of a SHED. If so, then the community residents, to change, would have to create an amendment to the docs.

A shed can offer many advantages to an owner for storage of seasonal equipment needed, or even for overflow which does not fit elsewhere. However, a shed can also be an eyesore to view if not built appropriately, it can block another neighbor's view, and uppermost, can restrict grassy areas for the landscapers which would otherwise be easier for them to navigate.
For these reasons, IMO, a shed would impact property values.



HaroldS
(Arizona)

Posts:906


02/18/2008 10:21 AM  
"...landscapers which would otherwise be easier for them to navigate." We wouldn't want to inconvenience our landscapers, of course. Never mind our inconvenience for lack of storage.
That's why cemeteries now require flat headstones so the precious landscapers can just whiz across the area. I know, I know, it is all about saving time which costs money. But to disallow sheds because it would inconvenience landscapers is curious to say the least. What are they doing in your back yard anyway? Where I assume most storage sheds are permitted to be located.
PaulM
(Pennsylvania)

Posts:1347


02/18/2008 10:32 AM  
HaroldS: I guess I touched on another nerve. In 'our backyard' which is not ours at all, it is common ground, it would be highly impractical, unsightly, and block any nice views owners have of the large trees and grassy areas across the street. So, to answer your question, it would be nigh on to impossible for our landscapers to navigate their very wide mowers around and in between sheds. Our documents do not allow them.


HaroldS
(Arizona)

Posts:906


02/18/2008 10:44 AM  
Well of course. Common area. Under your control.
As far as disturbing views: I've never understood why some (my) HOAs disallow sheds and play equipment but allow any and all trees, bushes, vegetation; some of which can get quite tall AND messy if you are down wind. But I suppose those would be considered "views" and we should be thankful. Actually I am thankful my citrus trees have finally gotten tall enough to obstruct these views. LOL. Harold
DonnaS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5671


02/18/2008 10:53 AM  

I think that this is one of those situations that there could be no one answer. A shed in the back yard of a neighbor who has a sweeping view of a golf course or a lake, might be pretty angry if his neighbor put up a shed that blocked his view. Some back yards, it wouldn't matter. Down here in Florida, people pay hefty premiums for lots with views so that is 1 scenerio that says,-- no sheds.

I agree with "what people should do when there is no basements and have the garages full of vehicles?" My husband is a collector of "good stuff" and he is always looking for creative ways to stash it because we are not allowed to have any outbuilding of any type. I make him purge his good stuff once in a while and I am suprised how much room suddenly appeared. But I guess that an association cannot order someone to clean out their stuff so that they have room for other stuff and a shed might be the only answer but only with certain restrictions. How many hunderds of sheds have we all seen that are either leaning, rotting or rusting away and are definitely an eyesore.
DJ1
(Ontario)

Posts:798


02/18/2008 11:43 AM  
On one hand the more storage we consumers have the more junk we tend to fill it with, on the other hand, my shed with a cedar shake roof if much nicer (but costly) than the vinyl/aluminum prefab ones scattered amongst the HOA (of which most were never approved). I NEED the shed to BLOCK the views of the future cookie cutter sub-division/commercial areas that are yet to be built behind us. Sometimes the 'blocked' view is really something that some would prefer to be blocked!
BarbaraB5
(Illinois)

Posts:5


02/18/2008 1:32 PM  
With all due respect....I already know the arguments FOR sheds. I wanted some cold, hard facts about the disadvantages of having sheds. I already have my own opinions about how they look, or should I say, CAN look.
Yes, our HOA would have strict guidelines about type and color match to your house. I liked someones's comment about "the more space we have, the more we fill it."
Our homes are between 2400sq. ft. and 3600 sq. ft. with 2 and 3 car garages, plus full basements. When is enough, enough?!! And I know what will happen....sooner or later, you grow out of the shed, too, and then you start leaning your lawn chairs and extra lumber along the sides of the shed.
I really wanted to know if they really devalue the properties, if they really attract rodents, rabbits and the like. We are in cold, cold Chicago and the animals are seeking someplace warm to go and then to have their babies in. Would you want your 2 yr. old to go into your shed that's infested with mice and the like?
I don't need anymore argument FOR sheds. I've heard it all here in my own neighborhood.
Thank you for your time.
DJ1
(Ontario)

Posts:798


02/18/2008 1:43 PM  
1. Do they devalue properties? Probably if they look like sh**, but they may increase value if they fit in with the landscape design etc. ie. we built an in-ground pool so the shed not only stores equipment it houses the filter/pump and reduces the noise from such equipment.

Do you allow pools? If you do, wouldn't a shed be a great place to house the lines/equipment?

2. Do they attract rodents. Probably no more so than any other shelter...unless they are heated. It isn't the shed that attracts the rodents around us it is our HOUSE! We had the foundation waterproofed and a special fibreglass board is placed on the waterproofing, from ground level right down to the footing ~ 8' down. This in combination with the warmth of the house foundation is where we have had rats dig to make nice homes!

3. Going back to a properly constructed, designed shed, we poured a concrete foundation for the shed to be built on so no problem with rodents. Even the skunks live under the house porches etc. So I don't think the sheds necessarily increase the rodent housing. They'll find a place no matter what.
HaroldS
(Arizona)

Posts:906


02/18/2008 1:48 PM  
DJ - she's dismissed us, and apparently has decided what she already wants, so we're not needed in this thread anymore.
BarbaraB5
(Illinois)

Posts:5


02/18/2008 1:53 PM  
Excuse me. But I'm not dismissing anyone who has the answer to my question. I wasn't looking for arguments FOR sheds, that's all. And DJ had a great answer. Thank you, DJ.
I'm new to these threads, too. Is it always like this?
PaulM
(Pennsylvania)

Posts:1347


02/18/2008 2:14 PM  
BarbaraB5: It is sometimes like 'this' depending on whose reponse you are reading....

A few negatives were mentioned for you on sheds. But, I have another resource for you. Go to your local municipality, explain the situation and find out the codes and standards for erecting a shed. Now, if one would want a
temporary structure made of steel which will eventually rust, that is one type. But, if one wants to put in something which is structurally sound and "in keeping with the surroundings" (same finish as on the home unit), that is another story entirely. Obviously, these cannot be erected on common ground and would probably require a permit. That's all I've got for you....






DonnaS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5671


02/18/2008 3:05 PM  

Barbara,
NO, it isn't always like what some of the responses were to you. There will always be a few who see their glasses, half empty and others glasses are half full. You just have to learn to take them with a grain of salt and move on to more positive responses. There are some issues that will be very controversial and as long as they continue to pop up here,and we will never have just one answer to them.
DJ1
(Ontario)

Posts:798


02/18/2008 5:18 PM  
Donna, why one or the other. My glass is both half empty AND half full!

Sorry, couldn't resist.
BarbaraB5
(Illinois)

Posts:5


02/18/2008 6:15 PM  
Thank you, Donna!
Thank you, everyone, for your input.
I know this is a tough one.
MicheleD
(Kentucky)

Posts:4491


02/18/2008 8:50 PM  
Posted By PaulM on 02/18/2008 9:52 AM
BarbaraB5: You will need to determine IF when you state the HOA does not allow them, you mean the official documents actually restrict installation of a SHED. If so, then the community residents, to change, would have to create an amendment to the docs.

A shed can offer many advantages to an owner for storage of seasonal equipment needed, or even for overflow which does not fit elsewhere. However, a shed can also be an eyesore to view if not built appropriately, it can block another neighbor's view, and uppermost, can restrict grassy areas for the landscapers which would otherwise be easier for them to navigate.
For these reasons, IMO, a shed would impact property values.





On the other hand, a very large shed, built in the middle of a yard, or up against the edge of another neighbor's yard, painted red, or some other color that doesn't fit with the general construction, or that has a barn-style roof, or a flat roof (no pitch), or that is built of aluminum that will easily dent and bend.

Yup, that next to someone trying to sell would impact what they could get for their property.

Our HOA originally did NOT have sheds allowed. We did alter our CC&Rs to allow for sheds, however, they were very strictly controlled by the arch comm in terms of SIZE, LOCATION, MATERIALS, and CONSTRUCTION.

They could not be Home Depot or Tuff Shed "kits." The pitch has to match the pitch of the main home, they have to be placed within 20 feet from the rear of the house and must not be able to be seen from directly in front of the house. Lots that are oddly shaped can get special placement waivers.

No metal construction, no metal roofs, concrete footers are required. Colors are restricted as well.

We did just recently amend the guidelines to include certain composite materials as acceptable.

And a home can only have ONE outbuilding, and it must be either a shed, poolhouse, gazebo, or playhouse. One cannot have all four, or even 2.

However, resin buildings that are generally under a certain square-footage, usually the type that will just fit a lawnmower, for example, more of a closet size, ARE allowed as long as the placement is up against the rear of the house and again, can't be seen from the road if standing directly in front of house.

Those types of storage units can be up to 7-feet in height, though most fit behind the average privacy fence.

This is the largest one we allow before we classify one as a storage shed that is controlled for construction, placement AND materials. Otherwise, we just need to sign off on placement for these:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=19218-1217-FG374601OLVSS&lpage=none
DonnaS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5671


02/19/2008 11:33 AM  


DJ,
(
GeorgeS21
(Florida)

Posts:3806


08/22/2018 8:22 PM  
Old.
JerryB12
(Texas)

Posts:3


05/12/2021 10:39 AM  
Major disadvantages of shed is that it requires significant construction know-how, tools and materials. There is no warranty if you make a mistake. When building yourself, you’ll have to figure out all of the building codes and bylaws in your area before you begin. If you do not, you could end up with an illegal building not covered by insurance. You may even have to tear it down except if you ask for help from sheds company like this https://www.urban-sheds.com
SheliaH
(Indiana)

Posts:4291


05/12/2021 12:46 PM  
This is an old post and it appears someone pulled this up to do some free advertising. That's against posting rules, so stop it.
MichaelS56
(Minnesota)

Posts:300


05/13/2021 5:53 AM  
Will you shed some light why you are opposed to sheds?
DouglasK1
(Florida)

Posts:1689


05/13/2021 10:29 AM  
Posted By MichaelS56 on 05/13/2021 5:53 AM
Will you shed some light why you are opposed to sheds?



As Sheila mentioned, this is a 20 year old thread. The original posters are probably all gone from this board by now.

Escaped former treasurer and director of a self managed association.
Please login to post a reply (click Member Login on the menu).
Forums > Homeowner Association > HOA Discussions > Disadvantages of Sheds



Only members have access to all features.
Click here to join HOATalk for Free! Members click here to login and access all features.







General Legal Notice:  The content of forum messages are from the posting member and have not been reviewed nor endorsed by HOATalk.com.  Messages posted by HOATalk or other members are for informational purposes only, are not legal or professional advice and do not constitute an attorney-client relationship.  Readers should not act upon this information without seeking professional counsel.  HOATalk is not a licensed attorney, CPA, tax advisor, financial advisor or any other licensed professional.  HOATalk accepts ads from sponsors but does not verify sponsor qualifications nor endorse/guarantee any sponsor's product or service.
Legal Notice For Messages Posted by Sponsoring Attorneys: This message has been prepared by the sponsoring attorney for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt of it does not constitute an attorney-client relationship. Readers of HOATalk.com should not act on this information without seeking professional counsel. Please do not send any sponsoring attorney confidential information unless you speak with the sponsoring attorney or an attorney from the sponsoring attorney’s firm and get authorization to send that information to them. If you wish to initiate possible representation, please contact an attorney in the firm of the sponsoring attorney. Sponsoring attorneys that post messages here are licensed to practice law in a specific state or states as indicated in their message signature or sponsor’s profile page. (NOTE: A ‘sponsoring attorney’ is an attorney that is a HOATalk.com official sponsor and is identified as such in the posted message or on our sponsor page.)

Copyright HOA Talk.com, A Service of Community123 LLC ( Homeowners Association Discussions )   Terms Of Use  Privacy Statement