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Subject: Effective delegating to other board members
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Author Messages
JackJ9


Posts:0


06/21/2021 7:42 PM  
I think I'm a bit overwhelmed with board stuff right now.

Would be nice to delegate tasks to other board members. But they don't seem to get done unless I do it myself. I was an active board member as Treasurer, which then meant I became President since I'm active, but now I am finding it to be hard to plan for meetings, run meetings and coordinate projects. Starting to think I am spending too much time on board stuff.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:10590


06/21/2021 10:43 PM  
It is a VOLUNTEER. You can't really force volunteers to do more than they want to do. It's kind of like herding cats. If you want to delegate learn not to be a micromanager. The time table isn't yours. Work with others on what they want to do. They will do it if it is something they have an interest in or their job. So start enabling others than taking it on yourself.

Former HOA President
JohnT38
(South Carolina)

Posts:794


06/22/2021 4:01 AM  
Jack, burn out is a real problem. I finally had to decide how many hours a week I was willing to spend on HOA business. Once I had this number I started tracking my time and when I hit the maximum I stopped. The way I figured it is I can't add any value if I'm burned out.
SheliaH
(Indiana)

Posts:4291


06/22/2021 4:54 AM  
Been there, bought the movie soundtrack AND t-shirt! Your first sentence summarizes part of the problem- you something that needs to be done, people agree but no one volunteers and you say I'll do it myself. That's how I started as a mere board member and then became newsketter. That so on morphed into attending local CAI meetings because our president had started chemo and she really wanted someone there. Then we needed a treasurer - still don't know how I wound up with that.

Eventually I flamed out and you're almost at that point. From what I've seen of your posts, you would be a huge loss to your community, but your peace of mind is important too. Start by NOT stepping in all the time. Tell your colleagues the truth, you've been doing a lot of association business and it's getting a bit much, so going forward some things will be turned over to the property manager and it would be helpful if everyone else found an area they're interested in so the can oversee. It doesn't have to take over their lives and if everyone did a little, everything would get done a lot faster.

At first people will be slow to respond, probably because they're used to you stepping in anyway. That's when you stick to your guns - if it doesn't get done, oh well. Sometimes people have to see you mean what you say before they stand up.

When someone says I think we should do X, suggest that person oversee it. It may be something small like drafting a RFP. That can be done with the property 's help and the the member can provide a summary at the next meeting. Someone else could make a few phone calls. Another might draft an article that can be posted on the community website Or do some research on what it might cost to pay someone to do it.

I've always felt all board members should have an area of association business to oversee - you can take advantage of their skill set and when everyone exchanges information on what they've done, you can all learn from each other and hold each other accountable. U s one thing for people to talk, let's see who can back up the talk with the walk.

Oh, and use committees. You have homeowners who are really interested in specific areas, give them something to do and hold them responsible - that helps you find out who's serious or just talking out of their behind
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:10590


06/22/2021 5:04 AM  
Just wanted to include a helpful tip. At first I hated the idea of this but made me mad. However, after years of management it's a good idea. Basically my ex used to go off and play golf during the day. He was a supervisor at his work. He explained to me that sometimes you have to walk away from a project and let the pieces fall together without you. That way if they do fall together then your doing your job right. If the pieces fall apart, then you may want to work on what your doing to make that happen. A good leader have others whom can fall into place without them.

I recommend taking a week or two off. Take a vacation. Designate the jobs needed done at your next meeting. Let it lay for when you come back. What the aftermath is is where the problems lie.

Former HOA President
CathyA3
(Ohio)

Posts:2599


06/22/2021 5:41 AM  
I agree with others about burnout. I hit my "enough is enough" point when I found myself on a three-person board with two others who had no clue about what board service involved but didn't care because they wanted to do what they wanted to do and weren't going to let pesky things like CC&Rs stop them. I resigned (and almost immediately got hit by a case of vertigo that took months to straighten out and that made it impossible to change my mind about stepping aside).

Basically I've made my peace with the fact that I'm just one person, I can't single-handedly protect others from their own folly, and a painful experience is a far better teacher than I could be. (Rumor has it that the remaining two board members got themselves an education.)

You have to decide what you can live with. Yes, the community will pay a price when an energetic and competent board member steps down, but that's the nature of community associations. And frankly, every other homeowner in your community has an equal responsibility to see to it that the association functions well - if they can't be bothered, then a good dose of natural consequences is probably the best thing that could happen in the long run.
KellyM3
(North Carolina)

Posts:1806


06/22/2021 9:21 AM  
Jack,

If you're alone in volunteering, then dial back your activities to basic property management and maintenance oversight by utilizing your service providers. The HOA won't die if you even scale back business meetings to every two months in light of a lack of support.

It may be that you're pacing yourself faster than the HOA needs to pace to operate comfortably.
BarbaraT1
(Texas)

Posts:589


06/22/2021 9:41 AM  
For decades, I would start each new job with the goal of "I will not stress myself out over this job. I will fulfill my responsibilities to the best of my ability, but I will not take on extra work."

And for decades, I have failed. Because if you're the kind of person who is wired to Get Stuff Done (as I suspect most of us here are!) you just cannot sit back while something doesn't get done, or gets done badly. But for your own sanity, you must.

JackJ9


Posts:0


06/22/2021 11:13 AM  
Thanks all.

I like the idea of limiting myself to a set number of hours per week. Then when I run out of hours, I pause board activities until the next week. If stuff isn't getting done fast enough, I can encourage others to step up to the plate and chip in more.
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:8729


06/22/2021 7:30 PM  
Say, Jack, I can't remove this. would you remind us of the number or homes or units indoor HOA? And tell us about your amenities?

I believe you wrote you have a portfolio solo manager who only works for your HOA x hors a week. Remind us? I think I suggested that your HOA needs a PM who works more horus for your hOA and perhaps is onsite xx hors a week if you have an officer for PM.
JackJ9


Posts:0


06/23/2021 6:49 AM  
Posted By KerryL1 on 06/22/2021 7:30 PM
Say, Jack, I can't remove this. would you remind us of the number or homes or units indoor HOA? And tell us about your amenities?

I believe you wrote you have a portfolio solo manager who only works for your HOA x hors a week. Remind us? I think I suggested that your HOA needs a PM who works more horus for your hOA and perhaps is onsite xx hors a week if you have an officer for PM.




About 250 - 300 homes, operating budget around $250,000 per year. No clubhouse, so no easy way for a PM to work onsite part of the week, although onsite would be helpful because they could meet with vendors and mark projects out onsite, relieving the board of that responsibility.

Our PM splits her 40 hours per week between 8 HOAs, so that is probably about 4 hours per week for our HOA. Just enough to do compliance letters and delinquent account letters with homeowners and process ACC applications, but not much else.

Our HOA has about 5 community parks that include 4 separate play areas. We have many acres of community property, much of what is irrigated. Our annual landscaping budget is about $70,000 per year.

I think what is required to make our association run effectively is more time consuming than the average volunteer is willing to contribute. More professional help is definitely needed.
ND
(PA)

Posts:637


06/24/2021 5:29 AM  
Posted By JackJ9 on 06/23/2021 6:49 AM
Posted By KerryL1 on 06/22/2021 7:30 PM
Say, Jack, I can't remove this. would you remind us of the number or homes or units indoor HOA? And tell us about your amenities?

I believe you wrote you have a portfolio solo manager who only works for your HOA x hors a week. Remind us? I think I suggested that your HOA needs a PM who works more horus for your hOA and perhaps is onsite xx hors a week if you have an officer for PM.




About 250 - 300 homes, operating budget around $250,000 per year. No clubhouse, so no easy way for a PM to work onsite part of the week, although onsite would be helpful because they could meet with vendors and mark projects out onsite, relieving the board of that responsibility.

Our PM splits her 40 hours per week between 8 HOAs, so that is probably about 4 hours per week for our HOA. Just enough to do compliance letters and delinquent account letters with homeowners and process ACC applications, but not much else.

Our HOA has about 5 community parks that include 4 separate play areas. We have many acres of community property, much of what is irrigated. Our annual landscaping budget is about $70,000 per year.

I think what is required to make our association run effectively is more time consuming than the average volunteer is willing to contribute. More professional help is definitely needed.



Unless you HOA is not yet finished, how do you not know the exact number of homes you have and number of community parks? I'm also very curious about your 5 community parks and 4 separate play areas . . . this seems a bit excessive for what, home-wise is a somewhat small HOA.

Finally, you have referred several times to having to meet with vendors and manage/oversee projects. Can you explain a bit more in regard what sort of vendors you are meeting with and projects that need to be overseen? It sounds like much of what your HOA is responsible for is landscaping maintenance of the common areas and community parks as well as maintenance of whatever items are within these parks. It sounds like something where there should be a relatively straightforward contract to maintain with perhaps routine installation/removal of seasonal plantings. It doesn't sound like something where there has to be so much going on at all times and constant monitoring/supervision needs to be performed . . . unless your vendors are a disaster. But maybe your HOA is unique in layout, design, intent.
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