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Subject: Pool size in ratio to number of homes?
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Author Messages
ChrisD14
(Florida)

Posts:3


03/25/2021 9:46 AM  
Greetings! (first post here

Our community is halfway built out (approximately 500 homes) and a builder has just started the final neighborhood for the community (which will add another 465 homes). We have a great pool for what is currently built, but there are a lot of vocal homeowners who are now complaining that it won't be big enough for 900+ houses.

I am trying to find any kind of standard that community pools are usually built to, but after spending about an hour digging through multiple Google attempts I haven't found any. It seems there should be something that says "as a general rule, you should plan your neighborhood pool to have X capacity per X homes" but I can't find anything like that.

Does anyone here have a guideline or a rule of thumb they have heard about?

Personally, I think our pool is just fine for the future buildout. I also think these homeowners are complaining and getting worked up over something that we can really do nothing about until we actually get there. I am hoping to find out that according to industry standards, our pool is considered more than adequate so I can help calm down the clamor.

In case you are wondering, our pool is a combination of a four-lane, 25-yard pool with an equally large shallower, recreational area. It is described as 5,000 square feet of space. My rough estimate of water capacity is 130,000 to 140,000 gallons. The stated capacity on the swimming rules sign is 150 people. We also have 80 chaise loungers and 8 umbrella tables with 4 chairs each.
KellyM3
(North Carolina)

Posts:1673


03/28/2021 5:48 PM  
Chris,

My community features 296 homes and our pool is approximately 45,000 gallons with 3 feet on one end and 6 feet on the other. Basic square. The pattern of usage shows that the pool serves our size community well but you could argue it's too small.

Track trends and ignore the griping about a theoretical problem.
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:7949


03/28/2021 6:56 PM  
Welcome, ChrisD. I'd track trends too as Kelly suggests. what does sound a little skimpy are your tables & chairs.

I don't know if you can find an industry standard. Our 200+ high rise condo has a pool that's way more than adequate due to very few children living here. Can't recall it's size.
DavidG45
(Delaware)

Posts:38


03/29/2021 6:19 AM  
I am not aware of any rules of thumb. What my experience does tell me is that after the first few weeks of summer pools tend to not be used nearly as much as people expect. I was in a massive condo community once with a pool that was about 25x40, and it was never crowded.

More importantly, as you noted people are getting worked up about something that hasn't happened and they can't do anything about. I assume you are still under developer control? Are the number of homes and pool size the same as what was filed with the state? Does it match what buyers understood when they bought their homes?
ChrisD14
(Florida)

Posts:3


03/29/2021 8:33 AM  
Thank you for the responses!

Yes, we are still under developer control. I am currently the only resident board member. From what I understand, the pool was built to what was filed with the county (along with the number of homes -- buildout has been exactly what was expected).

I like the suggestion to monitor and record the pool usage. I will create a document or calendar for the amenities manager to make notations on for how much the pool is being used. That will give us some hard data to review and if the complaints continue, I can speak from analyzing actual numbers instead of speculation and generalities.

CindyH6
(Florida)

Posts:70


03/31/2021 7:25 AM  
Posted By ChrisD14 on 03/29/2021 8:33 AM
Thank you for the responses!

Yes, we are still under developer control. I am currently the only resident board member. From what I understand, the pool was built to what was filed with the county (along with the number of homes -- buildout has been exactly what was expected).

I like the suggestion to monitor and record the pool usage. I will create a document or calendar for the amenities manager to make notations on for how much the pool is being used. That will give us some hard data to review and if the complaints continue, I can speak from analyzing actual numbers instead of speculation and generalities.






My HOA has a pool that could be considered too small for the 300 homes , but it seems perfect for the usage.

Some homes have private pools and they never use the community pool. That may happen in your community as well.

My husband and I go at certain times and usually get the pool to ourselves. We also have tennis courts that are rarely used.

A lot of amenities, don’t get heavily used once the new wears off.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:775


03/31/2021 8:12 AM  
Chris,
My Community is maxed now at 1451 homes. Our pool is almost exactly the size of yours. I think you better get used to hearing from the complainers if you are going to be on the board for a while they will always be there.

If you are still under the Declarant then they should be pressing them for the extra amenity. Pools are not cheap and large ones with all of the things it takes to make it happen can easily cost well over a million dollars. When they ask again ask them if they are each willing to put up the $1100 dollars and also probably the extra $150 each year for maintenance of there dreams. Then remind them that after the developers leaves all they need to do is get 67% of the homeowners to agree with them to get it started. Do you even have the open space for this Pool? Most builders want to sell lots not build Pools that cost them lots of space. The people that complain the most never do the math and have no idea how HOAs actually work.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:10817


03/31/2021 10:30 AM  
Posted By MarkM19 on 03/31/2021 8:12 AM
Chris,
My Community is maxed now at 1451 homes. Our pool is almost exactly the size of yours. I think you better get used to hearing from the complainers if you are going to be on the board for a while they will always be there.

If you are still under the Declarant then they should be pressing them for the extra amenity. Pools are not cheap and large ones with all of the things it takes to make it happen can easily cost well over a million dollars. When they ask again ask them if they are each willing to put up the $1100 dollars and also probably the extra $150 each year for maintenance of there dreams. Then remind them that after the developers leaves all they need to do is get 67% of the homeowners to agree with them to get it started. Do you even have the open space for this Pool? Most builders want to sell lots not build Pools that cost them lots of space. The people that complain the most never do the math and have no idea how HOAs actually work.



Well said.
JohnM63
(North Carolina)

Posts:17


04/05/2021 11:36 AM  
I concur with the above advice. Plus, if the current rule limits it to 150 users, you will soon know if there is a line to get in regularly and who cannot. Then may be the time to do the cost benefit analysis.
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