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Subject: Worst thing a property manager has done
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ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/11/2020 3:51 PM  
What's the worst thing that your HOA's property manager has done? And was the property manager terminated?

I am scheduled to sell a rental property, at a very good price, in 2 weeks.

Turns out that the property manager was served with process in a Federal lawsuit against the HOA. The property manager failed to turn the paperwork over to counsel. So the HOA didn't file a response, and the plaintiff has moved to get a default judgment against the HOA for over $500,000.

I don't know if the property manager turned it over to the board. And no announcement was made. The lawsuit turned up in a due diligence check.
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/11/2020 4:21 PM  
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/11/2020 3:51 PM
Turns out that the property manager was served with process in a Federal lawsuit against the HOA. The property manager failed to turn the paperwork over to counsel. So the HOA didn't file a response, and the plaintiff has moved to get a default judgment against the HOA for over $500,000.
Lol. I love it.

I presume the HOA attorneys will get rid of the default judgment and proceed with the HOA's pleading, discovery, et cetera. Hopefully the Board fires the property manager, for cause.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/11/2020 4:44 PM  
Posted By AugustinD on 11/11/2020 4:21 PM
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/11/2020 3:51 PM
Turns out that the property manager was served with process in a Federal lawsuit against the HOA. The property manager failed to turn the paperwork over to counsel. So the HOA didn't file a response, and the plaintiff has moved to get a default judgment against the HOA for over $500,000.
Lol. I love it.

I presume the HOA attorneys will get rid of the default judgment and proceed with the HOA's pleading, discovery, et cetera. Hopefully the Board fires the property manager, for cause.




The property manager is on the board.
GenoS
(Florida)

Posts:4158


11/11/2020 6:04 PM  
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/11/2020 3:51 PM
What's the worst thing that your HOA's property manager has done? And was the property manager terminated?

I am scheduled to sell a rental property, at a very good price, in 2 weeks.

Turns out that the property manager was served with process in a Federal lawsuit against the HOA. The property manager failed to turn the paperwork over to counsel. So the HOA didn't file a response, and the plaintiff has moved to get a default judgment against the HOA for over $500,000.

I don't know if the property manager turned it over to the board. And no announcement was made. The lawsuit turned up in a due diligence check.

I thought that was the point of having a Registered Agent. Aren't Registered Agents usually served with a summons?
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/11/2020 6:09 PM  
Posted By GenoS on 11/11/2020 6:04 PM
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/11/2020 3:51 PM
What's the worst thing that your HOA's property manager has done? And was the property manager terminated?

I am scheduled to sell a rental property, at a very good price, in 2 weeks.

Turns out that the property manager was served with process in a Federal lawsuit against the HOA. The property manager failed to turn the paperwork over to counsel. So the HOA didn't file a response, and the plaintiff has moved to get a default judgment against the HOA for over $500,000.

I don't know if the property manager turned it over to the board. And no announcement was made. The lawsuit turned up in a due diligence check.

I thought that was the point of having a Registered Agent. Aren't Registered Agents usually served with a summons?




No registered agent was needed; the property manager listed itself as the address of the HOA on state records.
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:7660


11/11/2020 6:52 PM  
Must you now disclose this lawsuit to your prospective buyers?
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/11/2020 7:44 PM  
Posted By GenoS on 11/11/2020 6:04 PM
I thought that was the point of having a Registered Agent. Aren't Registered Agents usually served with a summons?
Per Court Rules and/or statute, my understanding is yes.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/11/2020 8:34 PM  
Lawsuits are reported on the HUD form for loans that require it. So if the buyer gets a government backed loan the HOA fills it out. Whether you the seller are directly is a good question.

Former HOA President
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 2:34 AM  
Thanks. Yes, I got my real estate agent to send the court filings to the buyer. It’s certainly concerning so I thought that the buyer should know.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/12/2020 3:52 AM  
Wait a minute YOU thought the buyer should know? That's NOT how things necessarily work. Your Realtor should have told you this as well. Surprised they sent over that information.

This is in no way being "crooked" or "unethical" by not reporting this information if the law doesn't require it. It really isn't your place to do so. It is the HOA's business to reveal it's lawsuit status to it's membership. A potential buyer is NOT a HOA member!!!

Now if the information is PUBLIC that is another thing. That then is most likely on the potential buyer to do their due diligence in researching. Their Realtor could help them in that area NOT yours.

Sorry but you do not need to reveal this information because your not anyone's "hero". The facts are that lawsuits are reported publicly or by the HOA itself amongst it's members. No need in sabotaging your sales and then blame the HOA for the sale not going through. Which is what I smell here as a possible set up.

Former HOA President
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 4:08 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 3:52 AM
Wait a minute YOU thought the buyer should know? That's NOT how things necessarily work. Your Realtor should have told you this as well. Surprised they sent over that information.

This is in no way being "crooked" or "unethical" by not reporting this information if the law doesn't require it. It really isn't your place to do so. It is the HOA's business to reveal it's lawsuit status to it's membership. A potential buyer is NOT a HOA member!!!

Now if the information is PUBLIC that is another thing. That then is most likely on the potential buyer to do their due diligence in researching. Their Realtor could help them in that area NOT yours.

Sorry but you do not need to reveal this information because your not anyone's "hero". The facts are that lawsuits are reported publicly or by the HOA itself amongst it's members. No need in sabotaging your sales and then blame the HOA for the sale not going through. Which is what I smell here as a possible set up.




Hi Melissa, whenever I sell anything (my car, rental property, etc.), I disclose all material problems. Period. That way the buyer can’t come after me.

In this situation, the HOA did not disclose the lawsuit at all, neither to the buyer nor to owners generally. I found out about it by running a search on Federal court records. And the HOA still hasn’t disclosed it. The lawsuit is valid; I asked a litigator to look over the court filings.

I would be liable for fraud if I didn’t disclose that, particularly since the HOA has only a few thousand dollars in cash available, meaning that an assessment or HOA dues increase may be required.

If you bought a home and then there was an unexpected increase in amounts payable to the HOA, and the seller had known that and didn’t tell you, if you were me, you’d be as mad as a hornet for being defrauded.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/12/2020 4:28 AM  
You are NOT liable that is the whole point. YOU made yourself so. No it is NOT on YOU to reveal this information. Especially since it is a NON-MEMBER of the HOA. YOU did the research the buyer should have done. It is NOT on you. So what if there is an increase after I bought into an HOA? It's par of the course.

Former HOA President
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 5:18 AM  
Hi Melissa, you make good points, but I want to have a clean conscience and disclose everything. You are correct, but even if a shady HOA hides material information from members, I don't want to go along with that.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 5:19 AM  
And, I reduced my own liability by disclosing this. I didn't increase it.
CathyA3
(Ohio)

Posts:1368


11/12/2020 5:47 AM  
In my state the seller who fails to disclose something they know about is very much liable. The realtor also has some liability, but there can be things the seller knows that the realtor would have no way of knowing. Ohio has a disclosure form that goes on and on for pages, but at the bottom is a statement attesting to the fact that the information is complete and accurate to the best of their knowledge - and the person who signs that form is the seller.
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 7:19 AM  
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/12/2020 5:19 AM
And, I reduced my own liability by disclosing this. I didn't increase it.
I agree. The lawsuit could materially affect the value of the property. Common law typically requires such disclosure. Often statutes do too.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/12/2020 8:33 AM  
Wait a minute... Who is getting sued exactly? You said something about the Property Management? If it's the Property Management getting sued or served then why is the HOA even involved? The HOA is a CLIENT of theirs. So if the Property management is getting sued that has nothing or little to do with the HOA.

You don't disclose information that isn't public or proprietary. The lawsuit information is still HOA business amongst its members. A potential buyer is NOT a member. You put yourself at risk of liable on the HOA's behalf for spreading information that is not for public consumption or knowledge.

My gut feel on this. Your fishing for a lawsuit against your HOA. Mark my words your wanting to find an angle to get a lawsuit filed. If not, then why you trying to stop the sale of your property???

Former HOA President
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 8:45 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 8:33 AM
You don't disclose information that isn't public or proprietary.
If a seller's furnace inspector found the furnace is leaking carbon monoxide at levels not acceptable under the HVAC code; documents this with the seller; and the seller does not disclose this, the liability is huge. Any number of defects, that materially affect the value of the home and are known in private to the seller, could be grounds for a lawsuit lasting a long time. The courts are full of such lawsuits, concerning home sales and failure to disclose material problems with the home.

Better safe than sorry. My rule: Disclose everything.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 8:59 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 8:33 AM
Wait a minute... Who is getting sued exactly? You said something about the Property Management? If it's the Property Management getting sued or served then why is the HOA even involved? The HOA is a CLIENT of theirs. So if the Property management is getting sued that has nothing or little to do with the HOA.

You don't disclose information that isn't public or proprietary. The lawsuit information is still HOA business amongst its members. A potential buyer is NOT a member. You put yourself at risk of liable on the HOA's behalf for spreading information that is not for public consumption or knowledge.

My gut feel on this. Your fishing for a lawsuit against your HOA. Mark my words your wanting to find an angle to get a lawsuit filed. If not, then why you trying to stop the sale of your property???




The HOA is being sued. The complaint was served on the property manager, as agent for the HOA. The property manager didn't forward the complaint to counsel. Thus the default judgment is against the HOA.

It's a Federal lawsuit and the court filings are a public record. I now see that they turn up if you Google the name of the HOA, even, as numerous legal websites show then. So even rudimentary diligence would reveal them.

Yet the HOA has not disclosed this lawsuit to its owners and the HOA never disclosed it at all even though the property manager filled out some paperwork in connection with my sale of my property.

And yes, the property manager is on the board of this HOA.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 9:00 AM  
Posted By AugustinD on 11/12/2020 8:45 AM
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 8:33 AM


Better safe than sorry. My rule: Disclose everything.




Exactly- my rule as well. Even when I sold a car about 10 years ago in a private sale, I walked around the car with the buyer, pointing out everything that could possibly be a defect--even the glove compartment that could rattle.
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 9:21 AM  
You said it, ChrisE8. I sleep better at night, too, knowing that, after full disclosure, the chances of something going wrong post-sale are greatly reduced.

I think one of the beauties of craigslist is how so many (granted maybe not all) people post photos highlighting any flaws with whatever they are selling. They want a good transaction, with no complaints afterwards.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/12/2020 9:25 AM  
There are "lemon laws" where you must reveal about cars. However, when it comes to your property/home you reveal what is wrong with the HOME/Property. When it comes to the HOA, that is on them to report or not. That is the DIFFERENCE here. The HOA is NOT your home. It is a SEPARATE entity. An entity your potential buyer isn't a member of.

I still don't think the lawsuit your talking about is accurate information. Something isn't matching here. Your doing this all online as well. If it isn't in the meeting records of the HOA, then wouldn't go by what read online.

Former HOA President
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 9:37 AM  
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/12/2020 8:59 AM
Yet the HOA has not disclosed this lawsuit to its owners and the HOA never disclosed it at all even though the property manager filled out some paperwork in connection with my sale of my property.
I think what the HOA's obligations are to members and on statutorily-required disclosure paperwork is an interesting question. Lots of web sites discuss this. The sites seem to lean towards the HOA having to disclose 'less, not more,' on account of attorney-client privilege; being able to strategize without showing their hand of cards to the other party in the suit; and so on.

I think a lot of the states that have "HOA/Condo Disclosure Statements" required actually require that the seller complete these statements. The HOA may help (and even bill a flat fee for this), but the onus legally may be on the seller.

North Carolina does not appear to have any meaningful requirements for a HOA itself to disclose information prior to sale. In NC, maybe covenants and the existence of the HOA are all that need be disclosed, and the burden appears to be on the seller and realtor/agents.

I am aware that one of my former HOAs did not disclose litigation it had recently begun in court to a buyer (or the seller, for that matter) the following month, before the sale closed. Yes, the lawsuit was public record.

Then again, I do not think I have heard of any appeals court decision involving a plaintiff suing a corporation over a failure to disclose litigation where the corporation was a party.

For corporations, lawsuit disclosure obligations seem to arise mostly in the context of financial statements.
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 9:39 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 9:25 AM
I still don't think the lawsuit your talking about is accurate information. Something isn't matching here. Your doing this all online as well. If it isn't in the meeting records of the HOA, then wouldn't go by what read online.
At most, all that is needed to see what a plaintiff to a lawsuit is demanding is a trip to the courthouse and about three minutes of reading the plaintiff's first filing (the "pleading").

Sounds like a Fair Housing lawsuit to me. But who knows. And of course ChrisE8 has no obligation to share anything.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 9:53 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 9:25 AM

I still don't think the lawsuit your talking about is accurate information. Something isn't matching here. Your doing this all online as well. If it isn't in the meeting records of the HOA, then wouldn't go by what read online.




I don't have any meeting records of the HOA. What I have are copies of the complaint and a few other filings from the plaintiff, on records of the United States District Court for the relevant portion of North Carolina, and other filings evidencing the default. I think that those are pretty reliable--they are official court records.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/12/2020 9:59 AM  
Well then they should be part of your HOA's or Property Manager's records as well. They should be disclosed to you as a member upon request IF the records exist. That is why I find this situation a bit "hinky" to say the least. Plus would never reveal that to a potential buyer as it's not part of the home. It is part of the HOA business.

Former HOA President
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 10:05 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 9:59 AM
Plus would never reveal that to a potential buyer as it's not part of the home. It is part of the HOA business.
A Special Assessment imposed upon a home to pay the costs of a lawsuit is part of the home. This includes when the Special Assessment is imposed to pay ongoing costs of the lawsuit rather than just the possible, final court judgement against the HOA.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 10:07 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 9:59 AM
Well then they should be part of your HOA's or Property Manager's records as well. They should be disclosed to you as a member upon request IF the records exist. That is why I find this situation a bit "hinky" to say the least. Plus would never reveal that to a potential buyer as it's not part of the home. It is part of the HOA business.




It's all totally shady. But the property manager is on the board and of course the property manager wouldn't want any of this to show up in board minutes.
SheliaH
(Indiana)

Posts:3577


11/12/2020 10:21 AM  
Well, this is one reason the property manager shouldn't be on the HOA board! Even if the documents allow it, that doesn't mean it's a good idea.

I suspect the main reason property manager is on the board in this community is because that's how the developer wrote the original documents. Which is another reason job one for a new HOA board is to review the documents with their own attorney and delete all references to the developer

As for disclosing the lawsuit, I believe the HOA law in my state now requires that the seller disclose certain information on the HOA to the buyer before the sale is finalized, so I can see Chris' logic and agree with it. This is something that would come out anyway and if he hadn't said anything the seller might not assume he didn't know about the lawsuit and go after him. It may mean he loses a sale and while that bites, it's better to be out of the earnest money than to be on the hook for a special assessment that may be necessary to pay this if the judgement stands.

I just say that I'm fairly spoiled when it comes to property managers. I know in the early days this community went through several before settling on the management company we have now. They'd signed that contract a year or two before I moved in, so the three we've had have been very good.

Don't know how this case will end - hopefully the association attorney will be successful in fighting the default judgement and then get down to the business of addressing the lawsuit itself. Unfortunately for the homeowners, this won't be pretty because I see the Fed 's handiwork in my job and can tell you when it decides to sue, there's usually a better than 80% chance they have you by the...cashews and You WILL have to pay a lot to get it settled

AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 10:28 AM  
Posted By SheliaH on 11/12/2020 10:21 AM
Unfortunately for the homeowners, this won't be pretty because I see the Fed 's handiwork in my job and can tell you when it decides to sue, there's usually a better than 80% chance they have you by the...cashews and You WILL have to pay a lot to get it settled
I read ChrisE8's posts as indicating the lawsuit is in federal court. I am not sure whether the federal government is the plaintiff or, in the case of a lawsuit brought by HUD, is providing counsel to the plaintiff pursuant to what the Fair Housing Act says.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/12/2020 10:57 AM  
Yes Augustine something doesn't add up here. Seeing it online doesn't equal it not being something concrete in real life. Our HOA a lawsuit would not be ignored and a special assessment would be in place if needed. So for Chris to not mention anything like a special assessment or it being in HOA records smells of missing details.

Like do we know if the HOA is owner owned or still developer owned? If it is still under developer, then the developer would have the property manager on the board. Plus they would most likely be the one the lawsuit is against. It is still in the HOA's name. This scenerio would make more sense.

Have someone say they looked up online and found their HOA involved in a lawsuit isn't enough details to me. You can look up my HOA and see it was once involved in a lawsuit. It was when developer still owned it and they took back a bid from a lawncare company they promised to hire. This was over 25 years ago. 40K had to be paid out. However, it wasn't against us the owners so we didn't pay it or involved.

A federal court case not being discussed doesn't ring true or lacks context to me. Something is missing here...

Former HOA President
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 11:28 AM  
Hi Melissa, surely the board discussed it. But I don't have board minutes and I have never heard a word about it.

The issue to me is that the property manager, who is a director, received the complaint and didn't send it to counsel, so there is now a default judgment against the HOA. And nothing has been said by the HOA about that; the HOA has not disclosed it. Even though it's a public record.

That's just plain bad.
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/12/2020 11:47 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 10:57 AM
Yes Augustine something doesn't add up here.
You and I do not agree.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9714


11/12/2020 12:21 PM  
Why are you not aware of it? Is it the HOA's fault or you want to keep blaming the Property Manager for you NOT contacting your HOA? It is your responsibility to have gotten the HOA records to view them. I keep hearing you say they didn't say anything but also not where or whom your getting your HOA information from. You don't live there. So is there a news letter? Meetings? Where do you get your information to say or not say it hasn't been discussed?

Still have not said if developer or owner controlled.

Former HOA President
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/12/2020 12:25 PM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 11/12/2020 12:21 PM
Why are you not aware of it? Is it the HOA's fault or you want to keep blaming the Property Manager for you NOT contacting your HOA? It is your responsibility to have gotten the HOA records to view them. I keep hearing you say they didn't say anything but also not where or whom your getting your HOA information from. You don't live there. So is there a news letter? Meetings? Where do you get your information to say or not say it hasn't been discussed?

Still have not said if developer or owner controlled.




It's owner controlled.

I am aware of it because I looked in court records, but now I see that the lawsuit comes up when you Google the name of the HOA.

The property manager was served with process. It's the property manager's job to get the complaint sent to counsel. The property manager did not. Is a $500,000 default judgment not anything to worry about?

There is no newsletter and there has not been an annual meeting in 2020. Board meetings are not announced.

The HOA did not disclose the lawsuit to the seller in any paperwork that that the HOA provided to the seller.

And the HOA has not disclosed the lawsuit in any communications to owners generally; the other owners who I know confirmed that they had not been informed of the lawsuit.

None of this is my fault. It's the property manager's fault for not giving the complaint to counsel and the HOA's fault for not disclosing the lawsuit to the buyer in paperwork.


KerryL1
(California)

Posts:7660


11/12/2020 5:18 PM  
I think, Chris the as a seller, you must disclose this to the buyer. At least you must in CA. what abut NC?
FloridaC1
(Florida)

Posts:3


11/12/2020 6:54 PM  
You all do know that when an estoppel is processed, there is the question of whether the HOA is involved in litigation, right?
That's where disclosure comes in...
GenoS
(Florida)

Posts:4158


11/13/2020 12:03 AM  
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/11/2020 6:09 PM
No registered agent was needed; the property manager listed itself as the address of the HOA on state records.

https://www.cscglobal.com/service/cls/new-york-registered-agent/

"If you intend to conduct business as a legal entity in the state of New York, state law requires that your organization designate a NY Registered Agent. The Registered Agent is a live person responsible for receiving all official legal documents — called “service of process” — and forwarding them to your company."

Interesting.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/13/2020 2:49 AM  
Posted By GenoS on 11/13/2020 12:03 AM
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/11/2020 6:09 PM
No registered agent was needed; the property manager listed itself as the address of the HOA on state records.

https://www.cscglobal.com/service/cls/new-york-registered-agent/

"If you intend to conduct business as a legal entity in the state of New York, state law requires that your organization designate a NY Registered Agent. The Registered Agent is a live person responsible for receiving all official legal documents — called “service of process” — and forwarding them to your company."

Interesting.




Thanks. This is NC. The property manager can serve as registered agent as long as the property manager has an office in the state.

Kerry1, thanks. I thought that it needed to be disclosed. I haven't checked the law on it, but under common law, not disclosing something like this could be fraud.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:225


11/13/2020 9:08 AM  
UPDATE

The buyer didn't seem to care about the lawsuit. So I have a clean conscience and the sale is still scheduled.

However, I Googled the property manager and the #2 in charge at the property management company was sentenced to 20 years of prison for theft (over $1 million) from a real estate company several decades ago.

WTF-yes, we all change (hopefully for the better), but putting someone in charge of property management and on your board of directors when the person stole from a real estate company is just something to think twice about. Would that bother you? (I am not looking for legal advice here.)

Thanks.
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/13/2020 9:10 AM  
Posted By FloridaC1 on 11/12/2020 6:54 PM
You all do know that when an estoppel is processed, there is the question of whether the HOA is involved in litigation, right? That's where disclosure comes in...
Your post does not make sense to me. I do not see signs of anything having been estopped here. Default judgments may be set aside by motion and then an order from the judge. Typically the reason is to ensure justice happens and the lawsuit is not re-tried, wasting court resources further. Judges set aside default judgments all the time.
AugustinD


Posts:4421


11/13/2020 9:13 AM  
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/13/2020 9:08 AM
However, I Googled the property manager and the #2 in charge at the property management company was sentenced to 20 years of prison for theft (over $1 million) from a real estate company several decades ago.
I am amused to say the least. This has to be among the best real life soap operas on the East Coast.

Are you wondering if you need to disclose to the buyer the #2s conviction? I think not. Public record and all.

Chuckling here.

I am glad your sale remains on track.
CathyA3
(Ohio)

Posts:1368


11/13/2020 9:22 AM  
Posted By ChrisE8 on 11/13/2020 9:08 AM


... snip ...

However, I Googled the property manager and the #2 in charge at the property management company was sentenced to 20 years of prison for theft (over $1 million) from a real estate company several decades ago.

WTF-yes, we all change (hopefully for the better), but putting someone in charge of property management and on your board of directors when the person stole from a real estate company is just something to think twice about. Would that bother you? (I am not looking for legal advice here.)

Thanks.




It would bother me. In general, there are enough property management companies out there who do not employ convicted felons that the board could chose from. Why introduce a risk when it is not necessary?

As you say, people can change. But the fact that this person is currently employed in a profession where they could repeat their previous unwise decisions should at least raise the possibility that perhaps they have not had a change of heart.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:10130


11/13/2020 10:38 AM  
I am like Chris. When I sell something I want the buyer to know everything so there are no repercussions on me. I will give a prospective buyer any information I have. I want a nice, clean sale that ends with everybody happy.

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