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Subject: Old rural community in peril, needs HOA, residents say NO WAY!
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EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/27/2020 11:04 AM  
Hi all. I am trying to save a dying Colorado rural community (under 50 homes) that has multiple problems on the horizon. The subdivision has a Covenant which is about as bare-bones as one could hope - mostly just a repeat of County ordinances. The County doesn't have/want anything to do with Covenants any more, they pretend covenants don't exist. The vast majority of the homes in this development are so VEHEMENTLY opposed to any form of "Association", even if it is nonprofit and relies on donations! They foolishly believe that all HOAs are "evil", hell-bent on taking away their horses and demolishing their outbuildings. Our Covenant is one of the shortest, most benign ones I have ever seen, but people see the Covenant as a Letter from Satan himself, and anyone who wants an HOA as a minion of the Devil!

The primary risks to this development stem from the fact that it was all the brainchild of ONE man, who owned all the land all the water rights and did all the work himself to bring it into existence and grow from a population of 0 to approx 120 in the span of a decade. He left NO instruction manual behind, and most of his former crew who helped keep the place running have scattered to the wind - replaced by either incompetent hourly labor or not replaced at all. Most of the heavy machinery, like the road grader and the massive brush-hog tractor, are gone now too - never coming back.

Here are the main threats we are suddenly facing:
---------------
Safety - Fire is a big one. We are surrounded by native grassland, and there is a common area that runs through the center of the development that hasn't been mowed for several years. It is full of baby rattlesnakes and dry dead vegetation. The nearest ambulance or fire truck is 30 minutes away, so the less DRY FUEL there is out here the better. There was a brush fire less than 6 weeks ago, and there will be more and more as time goes on!

Roads - We have a 3 mile gravel road that is 20 years old and haven't gotten new material for half that time. Corners are washing out and sliding down the slope, ruts are getting deeper every day. 10-foot snow drifts are infrequent but do occur.

Legal - Our water provider MAY be in violation of several different regulatory agencies' rules/laws. If they are, the subdivision's ONLY source of water could be seized by authorities (it would be a drastic measure, but it is possible). If this occurs, our development NEEDS some form of legally-recognized 'entity' in order to have a collective voice in legal matters. It is possible the wells/water-rights could be handed over to the HOA, and if there ISN'T an HOA then the water would probably default back to a government authority - and we'd all literally shrivel up and die. It is possible the water consumption here will be severely curtailed, and we should definitely have a collective voice in that matter!

Paying contractors - When the eventual "black swan" event occurs, we'll have to hire a contractor to fix it. The contractor will expect a single, non-bouncing check from an HOA, not 50 individual personal checks from residents.
---------------

It is already very clear that 70-90% of the homeowners here do NOT want ANY kind of association/entity "telling us what to do" or "stealing our money". I don't know anyone here, including myself, who DOES want to tell anyone what to do. We all, myself included, moved rural to have a quieter life with less rules and more liberty. But what people just don't seem to see is that "THEY", who have always taken care of the development the last 15 years, was ONE MAN who is now deceased. We are on our own, we need to take responsibility for ourselves, but residents keep thinking "THEY" will still be plowing snow this winter.

What we would like is a BARE-BONES entity, with as little "evil powers" as possible. All it needs to be is a fund to take care of quarterly road grading, infrequent snow removal, mowing the fields, and a legal entity that exists to represent the homeowners in case bad things happen to our water/infrastructure.

What should we do? Is it possible for the dozen-or-so people here who understand the need, to form a VOLUNTARY HOA without the support of the residents, throw some initial funding into it, and elect a minimum board? We want every single resident to have an equal vote and voice on all aspects of our future, even if none of them cast a vote.
Myself and a few others are willing to volunteer some time and money to make it happen, but we have no idea how to proceed.

Is this a lost cause?
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:128


09/27/2020 11:09 AM  
YOU DO NOT "NEED" A HOA. NOR DOES ANYONE, EXCEPT IN A MULTIFAMILY BUILDING. PERIOD.

I love my HOA but in your situation, people have made it clear that they don't want a HOA.

Just organize an informal, unincorporated association, and ask people to contribute time and money to the issues that you listed.
EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/27/2020 11:17 AM  
I don't want any HOA either, but we can't just lose our water because there was nobody there to accept it.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:128


09/27/2020 11:31 AM  
If your water is seized, then if you need an entity at that time, then an entity can be formed within 24 hours by filing a Certificate of Incorporation with the Colorado Secretary of State.

That seems unlikely, so until then, I don't see that you "have" to have a HOA.
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/27/2020 11:37 AM  
-- Covenants are not a bare-bones anything. You and your neighbors have a legal right to enfore the covenants in the courts.

-- The County has zero legal obligation to enforce any covenant applying to your land, unless per chance the covenant happens to be the same as a certain County ordinance. That you thought the County had a legal obligation to do so says a lot.

-- Your group can always solicit funds from folks who voluntarily wish to give money.

-- Creating a mandatory HOA will require 100% consent of all owners. Based on much reading, and in my experience, this will not happen.

-- Voluntary HOAs are notoriously, legally powerless.

-- Violations of state and federal law by your water provider do not require a group effort to remedy. I think any one of you (with the least bit of backbone and very little effort) can find the authority to whom the violations should be reported.

-- You need to research with the County clerk exactly who owns the roads and who owns the grassland. Then report back.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9648


09/27/2020 11:41 AM  
I do agree you do not "Need" a HOA, it is not just for multi-level/condos. It applies to other situations as well where common property is shared/owned.

Now your real issue is that you and your neighbors need to raise up the funds between you all to pay for these things. You need someone to volunteer or get enough money to pay to mow the common area. You all need to get money together to pay for the roads. Make sure you all own the roads, if not then contact the county for road maintenance.

For the water, you all may not need to be incorporated. Maybe need to offer up 1 person's address to the water company to represent. That is what our HOA did. We don't have an actual HOA address for certain things like utilities or water. So 1 person used their address. Maybe talk to the post office to find out how to set up a P.O. box.

It would be good for you to make a HOA for the purpose of funding. However, it doesn't have to be incorporated. Can be volunteer only. In the end you and your neighbors need to figure out how to raise the funds.

Former HOA President
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:128


09/27/2020 11:44 AM  
Great feedback from Melissa and Augustin.

My feedback is generally just rambling, but my general advice to people who dislike their HOAs is that they should just move. In this case, if someone doesn't like the absence of a HOA, my advice is the same: move.
EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/27/2020 11:47 AM  
I agree, if there is no threat then there isn't really a 'need'. But there is the threat, an attorney seeking information, etc. I guess if it is better to wait until the last minute to deal with it, rather than being prepared ahead of time, then procrastination is one resource we have plenty of. To me, this feels like not wanting to sign up for car insurance until after a wreck.

Despite it only taking 24 hours to form one, I still want to know how to do it now, rather than learn on the fly after the issue has already come to a head.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:128


09/27/2020 11:50 AM  
Posted By EricL7 on 09/27/2020 11:47 AM
I agree, if there is no threat then there isn't really a 'need'. But there is the threat, an attorney seeking information, etc. I guess if it is better to wait until the last minute to deal with it, rather than being prepared ahead of time, then procrastination is one resource we have plenty of. To me, this feels like not wanting to sign up for car insurance until after a wreck.

Despite it only taking 24 hours to form one, I still want to know how to do it now, rather than learn on the fly after the issue has already come to a head.




Click on "File a new record" at https://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/business/fileAForm.html.

That will create the entity, so you'll have an entity just with that filing.

There's more to getting a HOA up and running: creating the governing documents and getting approvals of owners may take a few weeks and will require a lawyer, but there's no point in doing that until it's absolutely necessary.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9648


09/27/2020 12:03 PM  
I think you and your neighbors need to get what the concept of a HOA is rather than listen to horror stories. Did you know that for HOA's foreclosures are NOT money making? They are ONLY stop the bleeding steps. So those who think the HOA can take a house away it is because they are NOT paying their dues. That is the ONLY way a HOA can take a home away. Not paying your fair share. Now does it sound so horrible?

A HOA stands for "Homeowner's Association". It's purpose is to have it's members the homeowner's have the legal ability to manage money to pay for it's maintenance/needs. Otherwise, you can't just collect dues or manage money amongst yourselves. Incorporating helps with legal needs but not always required. Can have a HOA that isn't incorporated. They can even be non-profit or for-profit. Most are non-profit. Meaning they must spend as much they collect as they spend out. They are NOT charitable.

So you can form a "volunteer" HOA for those that are interested and want to foot the bills. They get to enjoy the benefits more than those who don't.

Rule enforcement is subjective. I akin it to allowing owners/members to be able to get rid of an "outhouse" on the front lawn if one puts one up. The "rules" allow the other members to be able to get that violation removed.

Former HOA President
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/27/2020 12:20 PM  
Posted By EricL7 on 09/27/2020 11:47 AM
But there is the threat, an attorney seeking information, etc.


Whose attorney is seeking information?

What information is being sought?

From whom is the information being sought?

If you cannot answer the questions above, then yup, you need someone to hold your hand step by step through this.

Formation of a HOA with any kind of legal powers would take months at least.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:128


09/27/2020 12:21 PM  
Agreed. HOAs can be very good things. I love my HOA; the property manager and board and staff are all highly professional and do a great job.

However, as someone who's on numerous volunteer boards, I'm not in favor of making committees, rules and work when they aren't necessary. In this case, they aren't necessary. At least not now.
EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/27/2020 12:21 PM  
Posted By AugustinD on 09/27/2020 11:37 AM
-- Covenants are not a bare-bones anything. You and your neighbors have a legal right to enfore the covenants in the courts.

-- The County has zero legal obligation to enforce any covenant applying to your land, unless per chance the covenant happens to be the same as a certain County ordinance. That you thought the County had a legal obligation to do so says a lot.

-- Your group can always solicit funds from folks who voluntarily wish to give money.

-- Creating a mandatory HOA will require 100% consent of all owners. Based on much reading, and in my experience, this will not happen.

-- Voluntary HOAs are notoriously, legally powerless.

-- Violations of state and federal law by your water provider do not require a group effort to remedy. I think any one of you (with the least bit of backbone and very little effort) can find the authority to whom the violations should be reported.

-- You need to research with the County clerk exactly who owns the roads and who owns the grassland. Then report back.




Thanks for the reply.

-- I never thought the County has legal obligation to enforce, so I am not sure where you are going with that or what "lot" you think it says about me. I don't want any enforcement of the Covenant really...actually, I am encouraging other residents to understand that enforcement of it can only be carried out by residents or the HOA (as is stated in the Covenant), so they should not be afraid of what is essentially their own shadow. They see the covenant and the HOA as being the exact same "thing", and are rejecting an HOA because of the rules they think it seeks to enforce; despite it not seeking anything other than safety and water security.

-- Yes, I definitely want the HOA and its funding to be voluntary. I don't want anyone to feel that anyone is "taking" their money.

-- Good, I don't want a voluntary HOA to have much legal power, only what is needed to take custody and assure the continued operation of the Public Water Distribution System. The water entity itself requires at least 5 board members and at least one State-certified public water system operator (which they don't have), so if that is seized or dissolved, and handed over to the HOA, it's gonna take more than one person 24 hours to get all that up and running, take over the proper operation of a Public Water Distribution System, EPA compliance, etc.

-- You would be surprised how little authority the State and Fed have over these water matters. Compliance is largely voluntary and on the honor-system, there are 5 Compliance officers for over 2000 public water systems, they literally said "a System could send us Aquafina samples and we'd take their word that it came from their grid". The State can only issue alerts to consumers, and recommendations to the Provider, but they actually have no obligation to consumers to ensure the Provider serves safe drinking water. They can alert people that they are drinking contaminated water, but they cannot force clean water to come out of the plumbing. I've already taken several days off work to talk to multiple people within multiple departments of the State Health and Water divisions, I have already collected water samples and am preparing to submit them to a Certified lab. I'm already scheduled for meetings with an attorney. No need to lecture about backbone - that is why I am on this forum in the first place - nobody else will even look into any of this stuff even though it's about to smack them in the face.

But at any rate, the water issues we face are not only a of a matter of quality (Public Health Dept), more urgently they are a matter of quantity (a quasi-governmental authority around here calls all the shots, autonomous from the State, leveraging the State's enforcement powers). Quantity is definitely a "group" problem in this case, the acre-feet may already not belong to us.

The water entity itself requires at least 5 board members and at least one State-certified public water system operator (which they don't have), so if that is seized or dissolved, and handed over to the HOA, it's gonna take more than one person 24 hours to get all that up and running, take over the proper operation of a Public Water Distribution System, EPA compliance, etc.

-- The County Clerk and Covenant both agree that the roads are 100% privately owned by the HOA, and maintenance is entirely our responsibility. The grassland in question is all defined as 'recreational easement' or 'detention pond' (which is still flat and subject to flooding) that is owned and maintained by the HOA, as specified in the Covenant. There is a 100-foot easement at the back of everyone's property that is designated as community property. This is the major fire and rattlesnake hazard - people are supposed to be riding horses and playing frisbee back there, not getting lost in 6-foot weeds and bitten by rattlesnakes.
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/27/2020 12:25 PM  
EricL7, for you to get meaningful assistance, you have to post here whatever covenants, declaration, articles of incorporation you have, pertaining to this real or imagined HOA you seem to think exists.
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:9648


09/27/2020 12:27 PM  
HOA means "YOU and your Neighbors". So when you refer to "HOA" it isn't a "they or them". It is the entirety of ALL the deeded owners.

I think some people think HOA means something it doesn't. It means you and your neighbors or if still developer owned it's the developer.

Former HOA President
EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/27/2020 12:27 PM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 09/27/2020 12:03 PM
I think you and your neighbors need to get what the concept of a HOA is rather than listen to horror stories. Did you know that for HOA's foreclosures are NOT money making? They are ONLY stop the bleeding steps. So those who think the HOA can take a house away it is because they are NOT paying their dues. That is the ONLY way a HOA can take a home away. Not paying your fair share. Now does it sound so horrible?

A HOA stands for "Homeowner's Association". It's purpose is to have it's members the homeowner's have the legal ability to manage money to pay for it's maintenance/needs. Otherwise, you can't just collect dues or manage money amongst yourselves. Incorporating helps with legal needs but not always required. Can have a HOA that isn't incorporated. They can even be non-profit or for-profit. Most are non-profit. Meaning they must spend as much they collect as they spend out. They are NOT charitable.

So you can form a "volunteer" HOA for those that are interested and want to foot the bills. They get to enjoy the benefits more than those who don't.

Rule enforcement is subjective. I akin it to allowing owners/members to be able to get rid of an "outhouse" on the front lawn if one puts one up. The "rules" allow the other members to be able to get that violation removed.




Yes, I hate how they only view an HOA as "evil" because of the horror stories they read on TV or experienced living in Aspen or Beverly Hills. We are Beverly Hillbillies and we definitely don't want any more rules or fees than needed to keep the place accessible and safe to live in.

FWIW, I literally have an outhouse in my front lawn.... well, it is a reclaimed PUMP house with a nice "patina" to the steel roof. It used to protect an agricultural well back in the 1950s, and I salvaged it to preserve a bit of the local history. All it would need is a crescent moon cut out of the door and it would look very much like an outhouse.

This is why it is so frustrating to see how opposed people are to an Association... I would be the president, and I'm the one with the damn outhouse on my lawn? Do they really think I'm gonna tear down their barn because it is 10 feet longer than it "should" be? Nope! My workshop is even longer!

EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/27/2020 12:45 PM  
Posted By AugustinD on 09/27/2020 12:20 PM
Posted By EricL7 on 09/27/2020 11:47 AM
But there is the threat, an attorney seeking information, etc.


Whose attorney is seeking information?

What information is being sought?

From whom is the information being sought?

If you cannot answer the questions above, then yup, you need someone to hold your hand step by step through this.

Formation of a HOA with any kind of legal powers would take months at least.




I can answer your questions:

-- The attorney of the aforementioned groundwater authority, which has final say over the allocation and usage of every drop of water that collects in the basin that supplies this geographical area.

-- Anything and everything about the wells, the flow meters, the electrical meters, the condition of the sites, the security of the sites, chemicals near the sites, power consumption records going back 20 years, GIS metadata, etc.

-- The HOA. The power company. Me. The System Operator (who hasn't responded to their inquiries for a decade), and probably many other people and entities.
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/27/2020 12:48 PM  
Saying more that has any meaning is impossible unless you provide the covenants, declaration, and articles of incorporation, to start.
GeorgeS21
(Florida)

Posts:3275


09/27/2020 1:12 PM  
Agree with Augustin.

A lot more information is needed.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:128


09/27/2020 2:51 PM  
Posted By EricL7 on 09/27/2020 11:47 AM
I agree, if there is no threat then there isn't really a 'need'. But there is the threat, an attorney seeking information, etc. I guess if it is better to wait until the last minute to deal with it, rather than being prepared ahead of time, then procrastination is one resource we have plenty of. To me, this feels like not wanting to sign up for car insurance until after a wreck.

Despite it only taking 24 hours to form one, I still want to know how to do it now, rather than learn on the fly after the issue has already come to a head.




If an attorney contacts you, seeking information:

If you haven’t opened the envelope, write REFUSED and drop it back in the mailbox. That’s what I’ve done (and the attorney was enraged, but he didn’t get what he wanted).

Or get a lawyer and pass along the request to him or her.

That does not require creation of a HOA.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:10014


09/27/2020 2:57 PM  
Eric

Were I you, I would be looking to get a group of concerned owners together and each contribute some money to a "war chest" to hire an attorney to review the situation and advise. I know it is possible to form so limited entities to maintain roads and maintain the water system. I forget what they are called.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:10014


09/27/2020 2:57 PM  
Eric

Were I you, I would be looking to get a group of concerned owners together and each contribute some money to a "war chest" to hire an attorney to review the situation and advise. I know it is possible to form so limited entities to maintain roads and maintain the water system. I forget what they are called.
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/27/2020 3:04 PM  
Posted By JohnC46 on 09/27/2020 2:57 PM
EI know it is possible to form so limited entities to maintain roads and maintain the water system. I forget what they are called.
Perhaps you are thinking of a "Road Maintenance Agreement" and a "Well Agreement." Nationwide, these are common, formal contracts that folks in rural areas use, with the help of an attorney or two, to achieve the (arguably, always somewhat complicated) goals here.

The question I have is whether there are covenants that already bind the neighbors to pay for maintenance of the roads and the well.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:10014


09/27/2020 4:15 PM  
Posted By AugustinD on 09/27/2020 3:04 PM
Posted By JohnC46 on 09/27/2020 2:57 PM
EI know it is possible to form so limited entities to maintain roads and maintain the water system. I forget what they are called.
Perhaps you are thinking of a "Road Maintenance Agreement" and a "Well Agreement." Nationwide, these are common, formal contracts that folks in rural areas use, with the help of an attorney or two, to achieve the (arguably, always somewhat complicated) goals here.

The question I have is whether there are covenants that already bind the neighbors to pay for maintenance of the roads and the well.



Thanks. I do know it is common.
DouglasK1
(Florida)

Posts:1538


09/27/2020 4:37 PM  
An HOA is typically explicitly formed in the covenants. Changing the covenants after the fact to create a mandatory association is highly unlikely. As mentioned upthread, it could require 100% assent. I've been following this board for years and don't remember ever hearing about it being accomplished.

As far as the issues, in my area the county would probably create a special taxing district to maintain roads, do the maintenance, and bill the owners as part of their property taxes. Probably the same for water.

Since the first post mentioned that the county is not likely to get involved, a road maintenance agreement of some sort could work, but would still need a board of directors or some other form of administration. Somebody has to collect the money, get bids, hire contractors, etc.

Eric, I think you have a real uphill battle in front of you. Getting some legal advice to really understand your options would help.

Escaped former treasurer and director of a self managed association.
EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/29/2020 7:00 AM  
Things got a lot worse... Our water storage and distribution system may be FUBAR! Black manganese dioxide sludge that smells like a public swimming pool has coming out people's indoor water faucets for about 4 days now. I turned my water meter off at the roadside to prevent the destruction of my water filtration and softening equipment... but I think many of the other homes here are going to need their plumbing ripped out and redone. They won't be able to afford that, they're just gonna abandon the homes and disappear.

Thanks for all the advice on forming an HOA.
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/29/2020 8:10 AM  
Posted By EricL7 on 09/29/2020 7:00 AM
Things got a lot worse... Our water storage and distribution system may be FUBAR! Black manganese dioxide sludge that smells like a public swimming pool has coming out people's indoor water faucets for about 4 days now. I turned my water meter off at the roadside to prevent the destruction of my water filtration and softening equipment... but I think many of the other homes here are going to need their plumbing ripped out and redone. They won't be able to afford that, they're just gonna abandon the homes and disappear.
I expect some of them will install a water storage tank and have it filled periodically until and if the well can be resurrected to produce appropriately suitable water. This is not uncommon in some rural areas where the ground/aquifer/yada water is contaminated but people want to enjoy the peace and quiet of a rural location.

I would say that the good news is that what is happening could very well persuade the owners to pony up $10,000 or so for a well agreement; paying for an expert to evaluate the well; and so on.
CathyA3
(Ohio)

Posts:1315


09/29/2020 10:03 AM  
It's unfortunate that often the only way to get through to stubborn people who are their own worst enemies is a painful experience or three.

Bad water? Oh well.

Road in such bad condition that you flatten a tire or bust an axle driving on it? Oh well.

Wildfire burns down some or all of the community? Oh well.

But at least they didn't have to deal with an HOA...

I'm sounding snide and sarcastic, but I'm sympathetic. There are few things more frustrating than being the one person who sees trouble coming but can't convince anyone else to do anything about it.

If you can get yourself out of the way and leave the fools to their hard reckoning, that would be the easiest solution. If there is a compelling reason keeping you in the situation, then take steps to minimize the impact on your personal finances and then let the chips fall.

But unless you have dictatorial powers, you can't save people from themselves. You can only save you.
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/29/2020 10:08 AM  
Posted By CathyA3 on 09/29/2020 10:03 AM
There are few things more frustrating than being the one person who sees trouble coming but can't convince anyone else to do anything about it.
The light bulb just lit. If I lived on EricL7's land, I would be investigating digging a well on my own property. Its cost and trouble is likely to be less than dealing with ignorant neighbors over many months, at a minimum, while I have to truck in my own water. The he-l with 'em.
DouglasK1
(Florida)

Posts:1538


09/29/2020 10:28 AM  
Posted By AugustinD on 09/29/2020 10:08 AM
Posted By CathyA3 on 09/29/2020 10:03 AM
There are few things more frustrating than being the one person who sees trouble coming but can't convince anyone else to do anything about it.
The light bulb just lit. If I lived on EricL7's land, I would be investigating digging a well on my own property. Its cost and trouble is likely to be less than dealing with ignorant neighbors over many months, at a minimum, while I have to truck in my own water. The he-l with 'em.


That's certainly an option if possible. Eric mentioned "water rights" in the original post, and it might be possible that he doesn't have legal authority to tap the aquifer on his own.

Escaped former treasurer and director of a self managed association.
ChrisE8
(New York)

Posts:128


09/29/2020 12:13 PM  
I would move.
EricL7
(Colorado)

Posts:8


09/30/2020 7:09 AM  
Nothing like a drinking water emergency to light a fire under some apathetic butts! Our water provider, who is a Public Water Distribution System which has to report to the State/EPA, has been operating illegally (no certified operator on staff, unqualified people adding treatment chemicals to the wells, failure to notify consumers of unsafe water conditions, etc) for a long time now. Last week, they really screwed up and dumped massive amounts of manganese oxide rust into the distribution grid and caused significant damage to some peoples' in-home water treatment equipment.

NOW they all want to have "community meeting" to discuss why the water is now black and crunchy, making sticky black stains on their kitchen sinks, smells like a swimming pool, etc.

People always wait until after a crisis occurs to start worrying about it, rather than trying to see problems on the horizon and deal with them before they arrive.
Myself and a few other smart people have called a meeting on the 10th to discuss our fate.

CathyA3
(Ohio)

Posts:1315


09/30/2020 7:44 AM  
Posted By EricL7 on 09/30/2020 7:09 AM
Nothing like a drinking water emergency to light a fire under some apathetic butts! Our water provider, who is a Public Water Distribution System which has to report to the State/EPA, has been operating illegally (no certified operator on staff, unqualified people adding treatment chemicals to the wells, failure to notify consumers of unsafe water conditions, etc) for a long time now. Last week, they really screwed up and dumped massive amounts of manganese oxide rust into the distribution grid and caused significant damage to some peoples' in-home water treatment equipment.

NOW they all want to have "community meeting" to discuss why the water is now black and crunchy, making sticky black stains on their kitchen sinks, smells like a swimming pool, etc.

People always wait until after a crisis occurs to start worrying about it, rather than trying to see problems on the horizon and deal with them before they arrive.
Myself and a few other smart people have called a meeting on the 10th to discuss our fate.





Exactly what I said. Painful reality: meet stubborn human. Now the trick will be to manage the transition from apathy to effective action. Right now people will be afraid and angry, and that's never good for smart decision-making.
AugustinD


Posts:4151


09/30/2020 8:15 AM  
I think CathyA3's remarks are wise, as they often are. Plus it sounds like EricL7 knows what is coming next. A few thoughts:

-- The IQ of an unregulated group of folks is inversely proportional to the group's size.

-- At any meeting, lots of folks will inject their ego and offer only knee-jerk responses and whining without solutions.

-- Many in the group lack the technical sophistication to weigh alternatives for a solution here.

-- More than half in the group will go nuts when they hear professionals' estimates of the costs of a solution.

-- Someone with leadership qualities to whom many of the others will listen will have to step up. Does such a person exist in this group?

-- EricL7, winter is coming. Buy your own water tank at Home Depot today. Shop around for water delivery companies. I think this would help me stay at peace while the mob slowly processes (altogether, over a year or more) how to proceed.
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Forums > Homeowner Association > HOA Discussions > Old rural community in peril, needs HOA, residents say NO WAY!



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