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Subject: Owner's truck won't fit in garage
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EmmeS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5


07/07/2019 10:54 AM  
The issue: 2 car garage owner with 2 cars. CC&Rs state 2 car car garage owners must park both cars into their garage and may not use a visitor parking spot for permanent resident use. This owner came to us and claims that his truck is too long to fit into the garage. They owned the truck before their house was built. In all honesty, they didn't think that this truck would be a problem. The owner has parked his truck in visitor parking, but now that we have our spots assigned to those without a garage and the rest as visitor spaces, he was receiving fines from us. The owner came to us ( the board) and wanted to work with us because he didn't want to be in violation, but simply didn't know what to do with his truck. His wife's SUV is currently parked in the garage. They are an honest couple who have not given us any other problems and are open to working with us in making a plan. We don't have off site parking either that is close.
we had him attempt to park his truck in his garage to show us. He's right, the truck is too long and hangs out of the garage.
What do we do? How are we going to be accommodating to him and still be fair to the rest of community. I can see the other owners with the following situations coming to us: the ones with a third car, the ones who have an adult child who lives with them temporarily, or even the ones who would rather use their garage for storage.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:8563


07/07/2019 11:03 AM  
EM

What do others with 3 cars do for parking? Is there enough driveway before his garage to park there?
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:8415


07/07/2019 11:10 AM  
Can anyone explain to me why this is considered such an eyesore for them to park in their driveway?

Former HOA President
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/07/2019 11:33 AM  
May, or may not, be an 'eyesore'.

Is, in fact, a covenant violation.

If not enforced against him then it should not be enforced against anyone.


Do y'all believe 'his' lack of planning and foresight should become the HOA's problem?
EmmeS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5


07/07/2019 12:09 PM  
2 car garage houses do not have a driveway. So his house doesn't have a driveway.
1 car garage houses also have a driveway that is long enough for 1 car and their driveway in considered they second parking space. We do not know what to do with 3+ cars per household at this point. open to suggestions
EmmeS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5


07/07/2019 12:10 PM  
their*
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/07/2019 12:49 PM  
Your 'job' is to administer / enforce the Covenant as written

or

seek the requisite votes from the membership to amend same.



Stop 'thinking' and begin administering.
NpS
(Pennsylvania)

Posts:3597


07/07/2019 1:02 PM  
Posted By EmmeS on 07/07/2019 10:54 AM
The owner came to us ( the board) and wanted to work with us because he didn't want to be in violation, but simply didn't know what to do with his truck.



He should have come to you with a proposed solution, not a restatement of the problem you already made a decision on.
Did he say he was going to replace his truck within 6 months?
Did he tell you that there are no off-premises parking garages that he can rent?

Or did he just say, Gee, I'm stumped.




Sikubali jukumu. Read all posts at your own risk.
MarkW18
(Florida)

Posts:48


07/07/2019 1:06 PM  
The SUV goes in the garage the truck in the driveway!
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:6541


07/07/2019 1:49 PM  
Agree with Pesty as I usually did when he was RoyalP, etc.

We have strict rules about car length in our underground (high rise HOA) garages. If one doesn't fit, they must find something off the premise or sell the too-big vehicle. Nowadays, with electric scooters, etc., someone might have to park off the premises & ride their scooter to/from the vehicle.

It is not the board's job to help residents break the rules.

GenoS
(Florida)

Posts:3135


07/07/2019 1:58 PM  
Posted By EmmeS on 07/07/2019 10:54 AM
This owner came to us and claims that his truck is too long to fit into the garage. They owned the truck before their house was built. In all honesty, they didn't think that this truck would be a problem.

But it is a problem because it's a clear violation of the CC&Rs. It's the truck owner's problem, his feeble excuses aside.

If you want to change the CC&Rs then CHANGE THEM. But until that happens everyone has to abide by them.
EmmeS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5


07/07/2019 5:57 PM  
he doesn't have a driveway though.
EmmeS
(Tennessee)

Posts:5


07/07/2019 6:03 PM  
I REALLY appreciate everyone's advice. I also am getting the fact that this guy needs to deal with his problem because it is not the HOA's to deal with. I like the fact that you all said, "stop thinking and start administering"

here are some other issue:
suggestions on what to tell people with a third car
an adult child home from college for the summer
a mom staying to help a mom with her newborn for a month

a guest pass? a temp hanging tag?
MarkW18
(Florida)

Posts:48


07/07/2019 6:23 PM  
Owners pay the assessments, visitors DON'T. If there is limited parking and accommodations need to be made, they have to be at the expense of the visitors.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:371


07/07/2019 7:24 PM  
I doubt that the garage shrunk after the homeowner was looking at the new purchase. I hate when people want an HOA to change the rules when it does not fit their situation. The HOA was here before they moved in and will be there after they are gone. I am a rules guy and love the rules as they are written. I read them before making an offer on our first HOA home. HOAs are not for everybody that is for sure. If they adopt to the worst offenders they will ruin it for the good homeowners that had their eyes wide open when they made one of the biggest purchases of a lifetime. The rest need to learn to comply or except the fines till they comply.
MarkW18
(Florida)

Posts:48


07/07/2019 7:37 PM  
Why not just execute the poor soul for not reading the rules.
GenoS
(Florida)

Posts:3135


07/07/2019 7:45 PM  
Posted By MarkW18 on 07/07/2019 7:37 PM
Why not just execute the poor soul for not reading the rules.

Becuase it's not a criminal case. It's a civil contract dispute.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:371


07/07/2019 7:47 PM  
Mark,
Why change the rules for the rest of the community because 1 homeowner wants the rules changed? It takes 67% to make this type of change to the CC&Rs. What do you think is easier to change? I am going to go with him to conform and learn to read the CC&Rs asap.

The board needs to follow the existing rules. If they attempt to make exceptions they will have no rules. Been there tried that.
MarkW18
(Florida)

Posts:48


07/07/2019 8:52 PM  
I have read enough CCRs to know there is a solution without having to amend them. Times change, cars get bigger.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:371


07/08/2019 8:04 AM  
MarkW,
I am not sure I understand your comment about finding a solution in the existing CC&Rs. I am guessing you mean ignoring the CC&Rs. The board members have a Fiduciary Duty to uphold the Rules and Regulations as written. If they do not like them they should work to change them and not ignore them.

PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/08/2019 8:12 AM  
Covenant:

An agreement, contract, or written promise between two [or more] individuals that frequently constitutes a pledge to do or refrain from doing something.

The individual making the promise or agreement is known as the covenantor, and the individual to whom such promise is made is called the covenantee.

Covenants are really a type of contractual arrangement that, if validly reached, is enforceable by a court. They can be phrased so as to prohibit certain actions and in such cases are sometimes called negative covenants.

There are two major categories of covenants in the law governing real property transactions: covenants running with the land and covenants for title.

Covenants Running with the Land
A covenant is said to run with the land in the event that the covenant is annexed to the estate and cannot be separated from the land or the land transferred without it. Such a covenant exists if the original owner as well as each successive owner of the property is either subject to its burden or entitled to its benefit. A covenant running with the land is said to touch and concern the property. For example, an individual might own property subject to the restriction that it is only to be used for church purposes. When selling the land, the person can only do so upon an agreement by the buyer that he or she, too, will only use the land for church purposes. The land is thereby burdened or encumbered by a Restrictive Covenant, since the covenant specifically limits the use to which the land can be put. In addition, the covenant runs with the land because it remains attached to it despite subsequent changes in its ownership. This type of covenant is also called a covenant appurtenant.

Certain easements also run with the land. An easement, for example, that permits one landowner to walk across a particular portion of the property of an adjoining landowner in order to gain access to the street would run with the land. Subsequent owners of both plots would take the land subject to such easement.

A covenant in gross is unlike a covenant running with the land in that it is personal, binding only the particular owner and not the land itself. A subsequent owner is not required to keep the promise as one would with a covenant appurtenant.

Covenants for Title
When an individual obtains title to, or possession and ownership of, real property, six covenants are ordinarily afforded to him or her. They are (1) covenant for seisin; (2) covenant of the right to convey; (3) covenant against encumbrances; (4) covenant for Quiet Enjoyment; (5) covenant of general Warranty; and (6) covenant for further assurances.

A deed to real property that provides for usual covenants generally includes the first five of these covenants. When a deed provides for full covenants, it is regarded as giving such protection as is extended pursuant to all six covenants.

Covenants for seisin and of the right to convey are ordinarily regarded as being the same thing. Essentially, they make a guarantee to the grantee that the grantor is actually the owner of the estate that he or she is transferring.

The covenant against encumbrances promises to the grantee that the property being conveyed is not subject to any outstanding rights or interests by other parties, such as mortgages, liens, easements, profits, or restrictions on its use that would diminish its value. The existence of Zoning restrictions do not constitute breach of this covenant; however, the existence of a violation of some type of zoning or building restriction might be regarded as a breach thereof.

The covenants of quiet enjoyment and general warranty both have the legal effect of protecting the grantee against all unlawful claims of others, including the grantor and third parties, who might attempt to effect an actual or constructive eviction of the grantee.

The sixth covenant, which is the covenant for further assurances, is not widely used in the United States. It is an agreement by the grantor to perform any further necessary acts within his or her ability to perfect the grantee's title.

The first three covenants of title ordinarily do not run with the land, since they become personal choses in action—rights to initiate a lawsuit—if breached upon delivery of the deed. The others are covenants appurtenant or run with the land and are enforceable by all grantees of the land.

In order to recover on the basis of a breach of a covenant of title, financial loss must actually be sustained by the covenantee, since such covenants are contracts of indemnity. In most jurisdictions, the maximum amount of damages recoverable for such a breach is the purchase price of the land plus interest.

Purposes
Land use planning is often effected through the use of covenants. Covenants facilitate the creation of particular types of neighborhoods as part of a neighborhood plan. A housing developer might, for example, buy up vacant land to divide into building lots. A low price is paid for the undeveloped land, which the developer subsequently sells burdened with a number of restrictive covenants. The developer might stipulate in the contract of sale that the owner must retain the original size of a lot. Developers can also make owners agree that houses to be constructed upon the lots must be larger than a certain size and include other specifications to ensure that such property will more than likely sell for premium prices because of the desirability of the neighborhood. Courts enforce such covenants provided they benefit and burden all the property owners in a neighborhood equally.

Covenants will not, however, be enforced if they are intended to accomplish an illegal purpose. The Supreme Court ruled in Shelley v. Kraemer, 334 U.S. 1, 68 S. Ct. 836, 92 L. Ed. 1161 (1948), that no court or state officials have the power under law to take any action toward the enforcement of a racial covenant. In this case, a group of neighbors were bringing suit to prohibit a property owner from selling his home to blacks, based on the argument that the owner had purchased the home subject to the restrictive covenant not to sell to blacks. The covenant was found to be unenforceable based on equal housing laws. To enforce it would constitute a Civil Rights violation.
AugustinD


Posts:1886


07/08/2019 8:49 AM  
Emme, A covenant is set in concrete until a court says the covenant is not reasonable and needs to be thrown out. I think it might be worth your HOA"s board's time to read the following California appeals court opinion: Bernardo Villas Management Corp. v. Black (1987), https://law.justia.com/cases/california/court-of-appeal/3d/190/153.html . This decision is not binding on Tennessee. Still, out-of-state court decisions often are cited in HOA court lawsuits as an authority of some kind.

Just saying. If I were on your HOA's board, I think I would lean towards enforcing the covenant as written and see how much money the truck owner is willing to throw at this. This is because he knew of the covenant when he bought into the HOA.

BarbaraT1
(Texas)

Posts:205


07/08/2019 8:49 AM  
Posted By MarkM19 on 07/08/2019 8:04 AM
MarkW,
I am not sure I understand your comment about finding a solution in the existing CC&Rs. I am guessing you mean ignoring the CC&Rs. The board members have a Fiduciary Duty to uphold the Rules and Regulations as written. If they do not like them they should work to change them and not ignore them.





Every set of governing documents I have seen allows the board to issue a variance from the covenants, which is what I assumed the prior poster was referring to. If the only reason for following a rule is "because it's the rule" it's not a very good rule.

KerryL1
(California)

Posts:6541


07/08/2019 9:21 AM  
In urban condos such as ours, parking always is a problem. Caveat Emptor! While we're lucky as we have 17 visitor parking spaces, many properties have far fewer. Developers don't like to use the expensive land in that way.

We have rules about Visitor Parking, especially that residents (an housekeepers) may not park in them. Another is a 4-day maximum stay. We have, however, permitted a grandmother staying with her new-mom daughter for a month an exception.

So, those with long-term guests or who have more cars than spaces usually find an empty space to rent in our underground garage.

I can see where a board could offer a variance as Barbara suggests, but not to someone who bought in the HOA knowing full well in advance their car wouldn't fit. A variance might be offered, for example, if someone in an existing home suddenly requires an oversized van for a disabled occupant.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:371


07/08/2019 10:53 AM  
Barbara,
Anyone who buys into an HOA with the thought that the Rules can be changed to fit their needs is not very smart. The people that have bought before them did so for the most part because of the same Rules they want to change. When variances are handed out easily the HOA board becomes weaker. I am not saying in some cases they make sense. IMO Variances are very similar Executive Orders from a President. They may be over turned by the next board.
BarbaraT1
(Texas)

Posts:205


07/08/2019 11:10 AM  
Posted By MarkM19 on 07/08/2019 10:53 AM
Barbara,
Anyone who buys into an HOA with the thought that the Rules can be changed to fit their needs is not very smart. The people that have bought before them did so for the most part because of the same Rules they want to change. When variances are handed out easily the HOA board becomes weaker. I am not saying in some cases they make sense. IMO Variances are very similar Executive Orders from a President. They may be over turned by the next board.




Most people who buy into an HOA have no idea what the rules are and have never read their governing documents.
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/08/2019 11:18 AM  
Posted By BarbaraT1 on 07/08/2019 11:10 AM
Posted By MarkM19 on 07/08/2019 10:53 AM
Barbara,
Anyone who buys into an HOA with the thought that the Rules can be changed to fit their needs is not very smart. The people that have bought before them did so for the most part because of the same Rules they want to change. When variances are handed out easily the HOA board becomes weaker. I am not saying in some cases they make sense. IMO Variances are very similar Executive Orders from a President. They may be over turned by the next board.




Most people who buy into an HOA have no idea what the rules are and have never read their governing documents.





True, hence the medical definition of : moron.

"The word comes from the Greek mōros, meaning "foolish, stupid," and shares this etymology with words such as sophomore ("a student in the second year at college or a 4-year secondary school") and morosoph ("a learned fool")."
TimM11


Posts:287


07/08/2019 11:21 AM  
Posted By EmmeS on 07/07/2019 6:03 PM
I REALLY appreciate everyone's advice. I also am getting the fact that this guy needs to deal with his problem because it is not the HOA's to deal with. I like the fact that you all said, "stop thinking and start administering"

here are some other issue:
suggestions on what to tell people with a third car
an adult child home from college for the summer
a mom staying to help a mom with her newborn for a month

a guest pass? a temp hanging tag?




In my HOA, owners get the spaces that came with their units (driveway and garage), and that's that. Some units have more parking space than others due to garage or driveway space; if people need more space, they need to buy one of those units.

We do have a fair amount of guest parking, which guests can use as long as it is within the rules that govern it (mostly around time limits).

That said, we've granted variances for special short-term circumstances.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:371


07/08/2019 11:25 AM  
Barbara,
I will admit that you are correct about Most homeowners do not read the HOA documents until they are called out for not abiding by them. My only come back to that statement is that nearly all of them have driven in and around the community. They liked what they saw which was probably clear streets and open roadways. I doubt anyone will ever say cluttered streets are the reason why they moved into an HOA.
RichardP13
(California)

Posts:3791


07/08/2019 11:31 AM  
Posted By PestY on 07/08/2019 11:18 AM
Posted By BarbaraT1 on 07/08/2019 11:10 AM
Posted By MarkM19 on 07/08/2019 10:53 AM
Barbara,
Anyone who buys into an HOA with the thought that the Rules can be changed to fit their needs is not very smart. The people that have bought before them did so for the most part because of the same Rules they want to change. When variances are handed out easily the HOA board becomes weaker. I am not saying in some cases they make sense. IMO Variances are very similar Executive Orders from a President. They may be over turned by the next board.




Most people who buy into an HOA have no idea what the rules are and have never read their governing documents.





True, hence the medical definition of : moron.

"The word comes from the Greek mōros, meaning "foolish, stupid," and shares this etymology with words such as sophomore ("a student in the second year at college or a 4-year secondary school") and morosoph ("a learned fool")."



Kinda like people who vote in elections?

Been there, Done that
BarbaraT1
(Texas)

Posts:205


07/08/2019 11:38 AM  
Posted By MarkM19 on 07/08/2019 11:25 AM
Barbara,
I will admit that you are correct about Most homeowners do not read the HOA documents until they are called out for not abiding by them. My only come back to that statement is that nearly all of them have driven in and around the community. They liked what they saw which was probably clear streets and open roadways. I doubt anyone will ever say cluttered streets are the reason why they moved into an HOA.




I'm not suggesting they allow street parking. The OP says the guy with the long truck has been parking in visitor spaces.

I once managed townhomes that allowed owners to rent visitor spaces if they were unable to fit all their cars in the garage or driveway. That's an option. Continuing to fine the owner is also an option. If he keeps paying the fines and parking in visitor parking and getting more fines and pays the fines...they are essentially renting him a space anyway.

I guess they can tell the owner to get rid of the truck or park offsite and... I guess Uber home? I suppose if he refuses to do that, the association could file a lawsuit.



RichardP13
(California)

Posts:3791


07/08/2019 11:52 AM  
Wondering how many CCRs state you can't have a variance on a rule. I have never seen one. I managed one association with such a problem and currently manage one with a similar issue, oversize trucks. The Ford F-150 in 1985 is not the same size as today. None of the cars are.

You make accommodations for changing times. Owners must come first over visitors, as they are the ones funding the association. Charge for the accommodation. We charge $25.00 monthly for using a visitors spot. They must fill out a parking application for either a third car or oversize vehicle. All vehicles must be registered to that unit and all driver license must have that unit as their address.

I didn't read my rules when I moved into a HOA, and I now do this for a living. So I am a moron, well I can join the tens of millions of Americans that didn't either.

IMO, the morons are the ones that think the rules should be set in stone.

Been there, Done that
NpS
(Pennsylvania)

Posts:3597


07/08/2019 12:05 PM  
Posted By RichardP13 on 07/08/2019 11:52 AM
I didn't read my rules when I moved into a HOA, and I now do this for a living. So I am a moron, well I can join the tens of millions of Americans that didn't either.

IMO, the morons are the ones that think the rules should be set in stone.



Well said Richard.

Sikubali jukumu. Read all posts at your own risk.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:371


07/08/2019 12:10 PM  
Richard,
While I agree with almost all of your posts including most of this one. I do have a concern with the last line of your recent post.

IMO, the morons are the ones that think the rules should be set in stone.

I would not advise you to use that comment as a Bullet point on your next resume. If I ever heard anyone of the PMs that have managed the two HOAs I have been President of over the last 9 years. I would contact the PMC and ask for them to be replaced. The Rules are the Rules until they are changed legally. Do you pick who you enforce the Rules on in your community based on your personal beliefs or do you do it by the CC&Rs or Bylaws?
RichardP13
(California)

Posts:3791


07/08/2019 12:15 PM  
Posted By AugustinD on 07/08/2019 8:49 AM
Emme, A covenant is set in concrete until a court says the covenant is not reasonable and needs to be thrown out. I think it might be worth your HOA"s board's time to read the following California appeals court opinion: Bernardo Villas Management Corp. v. Black (1987), https://law.justia.com/cases/california/court-of-appeal/3d/190/153.html . This decision is not binding on Tennessee. Still, out-of-state court decisions often are cited in HOA court lawsuits as an authority of some kind.

Just saying. If I were on your HOA's board, I think I would lean towards enforcing the covenant as written and see how much money the truck owner is willing to throw at this. This is because he knew of the covenant when he bought into the HOA.




What exactly does this case have to do with the discussion? A pickup truck was legally classified as a vehicle transporting passengers.

Been there, Done that
RichardP13
(California)

Posts:3791


07/08/2019 12:18 PM  
Posted By MarkM19 on 07/08/2019 12:10 PM
Richard,
While I agree with almost all of your posts including most of this one. I do have a concern with the last line of your recent post.

IMO, the morons are the ones that think the rules should be set in stone.

I would not advise you to use that comment as a Bullet point on your next resume. If I ever heard anyone of the PMs that have managed the two HOAs I have been President of over the last 9 years. I would contact the PMC and ask for them to be replaced. The Rules are the Rules until they are changed legally. Do you pick who you enforce the Rules on in your community based on your personal beliefs or do you do it by the CC&Rs or Bylaws?



I don't enforce the rules, the Board does.

Been there, Done that
RichardP13
(California)

Posts:3791


07/08/2019 12:29 PM  
Posted By MarkM19 on 07/08/2019 12:10 PM
Richard,
While I agree with almost all of your posts including most of this one. I do have a concern with the last line of your recent post.

IMO, the morons are the ones that think the rules should be set in stone.

I would not advise you to use that comment as a Bullet point on your next resume. If I ever heard anyone of the PMs that have managed the two HOAs I have been President of over the last 9 years. I would contact the PMC and ask for them to be replaced. The Rules are the Rules until they are changed legally. Do you pick who you enforce the Rules on in your community based on your personal beliefs or do you do it by the CC&Rs or Bylaws?



To go a step further, I have had boards hire someone to "enforce" the rules and, as you know, prior to applying a fine, the offender must be called to a hearing. A recently had A board member fire my company because I wouldn't fine someone to death, yet the Board never wanted to face the accused. They didn't being in due process and I was just making stuff up.

If I see an opportunity for a change, I will bring it and and help them through the process. I have found over time that many CCRs put into place for HOA's don't apply to them, they are just canned documents.

I could be a "get in, sit down and shut up" manager, BUT that's just not me.

Been there, Done that
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:6541


07/08/2019 12:51 PM  
It seems to me that permitting residents to park permanently in visitor parking (VP) DOES harm other owners. All owners pay dues for these; some rarely need them others need them a lot for their visitors. We ALL have access to all of them.

One reason folks buy in our HOA is because it has more visitor parking spaces than others near us. In our urban 'hood, parking is scarce & expensive.

If the board voted to allow an owner to park peramently in VP because their truck didn't fit in their deeded space, other Owners would howl. And, imo, rightly so.

If there's an abundance of guest parking and it's never full (which ours is family often), there might be more options.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:8563


07/08/2019 1:12 PM  
I am leaning toward allowing owners to rent VP spots.
SteveM9
(Massachusetts)

Posts:3303


07/08/2019 7:31 PM  
Its more complicated than you think......

Vehicles are getting bigger.... and its fuel economy regulations fault. Cafe standards.

Automakers have strong incentives near the edge of each step to increase car weight to move up to the next weight category, thereby reducing the fuel economy target. Meaning, its far easier and cheaper to make a car bigger, than to improve fuel economy.

With vehicles getting larger each year...... do your CCR's make sense anymore? Does someone new moving to your HOA need to sell their car in order to park it?

Long term, its a bigger issue. As autos get bigger, more people will have the same problem.
SamE2
(New Jersey)

Posts:133


07/08/2019 8:09 PM  
Can he make a deal with someone that does not have a garage and let them use his garage and he uses their outdoor spot or someone with only one car?
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/09/2019 6:49 AM  
Posted By SteveM9 on 07/08/2019 7:31 PM
Its more complicated than you think......

Vehicles are getting bigger.... and its fuel economy regulations fault. Cafe standards.

Automakers have strong incentives near the edge of each step to increase car weight to move up to the next weight category, thereby reducing the fuel economy target. Meaning, its far easier and cheaper to make a car bigger, than to improve fuel economy.

With vehicles getting larger each year...... do your CCR's make sense anymore? Does someone new moving to your HOA need to sell their car in order to park it?

Long term, its a bigger issue. As autos get bigger, more people will have the same problem.





basically correct

however

it is more complex



safety issues / vehicle requirements come into play re: DOT vehicle classification

passenger vehicle

mpv (multipurpose vehicle)

suv (sport utility vehicle)

light truck

truck

etc.


passenger vehicles have the strictest safety and operational requirements (and are getting SMALLER)

while the other classes may be USED and/or registered for passenger use ......................




chief among the differences:
a DOT classified passenger vehicle will NOT, repeat NOT, roll over on dry level asphalt unless it hits something regardless of steering or braking

any of the other classes may roll WITHOUT any impact if braked / steered aggressively

hence the warning sticker on their visor(s)



Now that you have read the FACTS you may start weeping
MarkW18
(Florida)

Posts:48


07/09/2019 7:55 AM  
I am sure that CCRs were written with your BS in mind.
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/09/2019 9:47 AM  
Don't think so.

They were 'probably' written in a vain attempt to prevent the 'visible' parking of trucks & vans.

? would you care to wager about the validity of my 'BS' ?

i will give you 5:1 odds, we can meet in Vegas and i will cover up to $20k on your end !

(loser also buys the plane tickets)

[email protected]
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/09/2019 9:49 AM  
Posted By MarkW18 on 07/09/2019 7:55 AM
I am sure that CCRs were written with your BS in mind.





ps. look at the DOT sticker located on the lower right of YOUR driver door panel - look at the lower right of said sticker - try hard not to puke -
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/10/2019 6:30 AM  
pps.

"typical" warning found on MANY DOT classification suv - mpv - crossover - truck visors:


forester14-safety2



..... safety rant over
MarkW18
(Florida)

Posts:48


07/10/2019 9:57 AM  
Posted By PestY on 07/09/2019 9:49 AM
Posted By MarkW18 on 07/09/2019 7:55 AM
I am sure that CCRs were written with your BS in mind.





ps. look at the DOT sticker located on the lower right of YOUR driver door panel - look at the lower right of said sticker - try hard not to puke -



I am sure every single one of the 1.5 Million HOA members in the U.S. have done the same!
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/10/2019 10:32 AM  
I, on the other hand, am only sure of two.

Myself

and

Thyself


Conundrum: If they HAD looked (and at the visor sticker) would they still have purchased?







PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/10/2019 1:23 PM  
Conundrum: If they HAD looked at (and understood) the CCRs would they still have purchased ?

Even if their truck would not fit INSIDE the garage as REQUIRED by same CCRs ?

TimM11


Posts:287


07/11/2019 8:28 AM  
Depending on the overage, he might be able to get a different bumper for the truck that will shave off a couple of inches (I think they are called roll pan bumpers) by being flush with the ends of the truck rather than protruding. I've also heard of people using short ramps to gain a little space by angling the truck upwards. But these would only work if it was just a little over.

Do your CC&Rs allow for altering the garages at all to make them deeper? Guessing no, but just throwing it out there.

He may just need to trade in his truck for a compact one -- if an SUV can fit in the garage, a smaller pickup probably could.
PestY
(South Carolina)

Posts:77


07/11/2019 8:42 AM  
SteveM9
(Massachusetts)

Posts:3303


07/11/2019 5:39 PM  
Thinking outside the box.....

Does the CCR say the garage door has to be closed? Simply park it in the garage, let it hang out with door open.
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Forums > Homeowner Association > HOA Discussions > Owner's truck won't fit in garage



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