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Subject: Pool Question
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Author Messages
ErinA1
(Illinois)

Posts:43


06/24/2018 8:46 PM  
Anyone have a pool in their association? Looking to get approx cost of installation, yearly fees, etc.
Thanks!
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:5656


06/24/2018 9:41 PM  
Yes, developers put it in. 200+ condo. Maybe 10-15% use the pool. Expensive in many ways. And,
after 16 years, we now must replace the pool deck and resurface it for the 2nd time. Pumps, motors, rules.

But, for marketability reason, we must keep it in our urban area where all high rises have pools. Lap pool probably cheaper to infall & maintain.
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:5656


06/24/2018 11:16 PM  
What are you considering adding a pool?
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:7611


06/25/2018 4:30 AM  
The question may be why adding a pool? Did the developer not install one? A pool does work for an attractant for potential buyers. However, it is one of those items that doesn't necessarily "Pay for itself". I would weigh the pro's and con's before pursuing purchasing.

Once you decide then prices for inground pools can be around 10K. Now you will probably have to have fencing, gates, locks. Be prepared for regular costs like supplies, lighting, maintenance, electricity, and a higher water bill. These expenses have to be incorporated into the dues. Which can account for 10 - 25% of your dues.

I am not against installation of a pool. I live in Alabama and it's something that is a benefit. However, it does hurt our budget and can attract vandalism.

Former HOA President
DouglasK1
(Florida)

Posts:1193


06/25/2018 5:09 AM  
Posted By MelissaP1 on 06/25/2018 4:30 AM

Once you decide then prices for inground pools can be around 10K. Now you will probably have to have fencing, gates, locks.

10k seems extremely low. Around here that might get the smallest pool that somebody might put in their back yard and almost no deck. A commercial grade pool that would be big enough to be reasonable for an association would probably be more like 50-100k, and possibly even more.

Escaped former treasurer and director of a self managed association.
SharonW3
(North Carolina)

Posts:19


06/25/2018 7:19 AM  
We are a 180 unit townhome community with a pool. Monitoring the pool is a nightmare. Kids from neighborhoods surrounding us are constantly using our pool by climbing the fence. We have access to the pool via a keypad with each unit issued a code and use wristbands as an identifier for residents. We do not allow alcohol at the pool and that presents an issue with many of our rental units. The pool is small and can accommodate maybe 25 at one time and on weekends overcrowding is a problem. Our pool furniture has taken a beating when by being thrown over the fence or in the pool. All of these issues create a headache from mid-May thru September. Don't rely on adult owners to question "bad" behavior because they really don't want to get into a confrontation or deal with the police if it goes that far. All the "swim at your own risk" signs do not deter folks from trying to sue when their unattended child is hurt at the pool. So, my advice would be to ask if the benefits out weigh the risks and the costs.
ErinA1
(Illinois)

Posts:43


06/25/2018 7:58 AM  
I am the current president of our HOA and have 1 or 2 residents that are constantly riling up others and now they want a pool. I’ve been on the board for 3 years and have a pretty decent grasp on how things actually work. I just wanted to share some numbers with them so they can understand the cost and by the way the first reason we will never get a pool is the land is owned by our Village and we couldn’t even get 51% of residents to amend our declarations to add a brand new FREE park from the village because of liability concerns! Lol just like to give our residents a dose of reality once in awhile!
MelissaP1
(Alabama)

Posts:7611


06/25/2018 3:42 PM  
Simply call a pool company that installs pools. Have them give a quote. You may want to have 2 - 3 quotes. You may even ask these people to go the quotes for pool installation. If they want it so bad, ask them to bid it out to present to the board.

After that, then show them the math of how much of a special assessment is needed to afford the pool installation. You may also want to include pricing out the costs of maintenance/supplies/repairs/insurance expenses. Those would be put into the dues. So do the math for the possible dues increase.

We paid $100 a week for someone to come check on our pool/add chemicals/cleanup. Our season is from May to September. Although it can stay hot into August/October so we may extend. We needed to save up some money for a possible pump replacement in the future. So there are some capital type expenses associated.

Keep in mind an inground pool can NOT be drained. It has to have water in it all the time. Otherwise it can collapse. So the rest of year when it's not in use, one still has to monitor the pool.

Former HOA President
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:5656


06/25/2018 4:14 PM  
What Melisssa means, Erin, is that you'll have many components with varying expected lives to save up for in reserves. some are cheap, e.g., a drain grate around the pool on the exterior and coping. Resurfacing the pool every 10 years or so is more. There also are pumps and motors for automatic chlorine feeing (or whatever product you use.) Your city may require a handicap at apparatus for such folks to use.

There are even smaller reserves items like pool ladders. The high fencing around the pool may last a long time but the gates will definitely need request maintenance. You'll want an entry system with fobs that can be deactivated when resident move away or have their amenity privileges revoked. Depending on your set up, you may want restrooms (or they may be required) and/or locker rooms

If there's someone to monitor them, you'll want cameras. There's more, too....
ChrisP5
(Missouri)

Posts:134


06/26/2018 7:12 PM  
Erin - Just a data point from the state next door. We have a fairly small pool and our operating budget for the pool including the utilities, maintenance, extra insurance costs, internet access for our camera and access control system, etc, runs close to 10K per year. I would have to pull our reserve study out but I suspect there is another 2-3K going into reserves each year to cover the capital items such as the furniture, pool deck, access control system, etc.

I bought here because I thought it was a nice feature. Given the nightmare that we deal with on the board side of things I would bulldoze the thing in a heartbeat given the chance. We just spent 1,500 to repair vandalism and another 2,000 to upgrade our aging camera system that caught some amazing video of the vandalism taking place but was of such poor quality it was useless.

SheliaH
(Indiana)

Posts:2252


06/27/2018 8:03 AM  
We got rid of our pool several years ago - as you can see from the responses, installing and maintaining them takes some work and a nice piece of money. Then you have to worry about trespassers, increased insurance because you will need it to cover possible injury for a variety of reasons, getting a pool monitor to keep some semblance of order, toddlers and infants using the pool without wearing swim diapers (possibly creating a health hazard when they accidentally pee or poop in the pool - adults could be just as guilty), etc., etc., etc. Because of low usage and assorted financial issues, we decided to get rid of our pool - we had the homeowners take a vote and presented repair estimates to bring it up to snuff, as the pool had been closed for a few years earlier. They voted to close and that was that.

In addition to all the routine expense mentioned earlier, you also have to consider the impact of a pool on your reserves. It will have to be added to the reserve study and then your annual budgets will need to allow appropriate deposits in the reserve fund to pay for replacement of major components. this will mean fee increases and you know how people are about that. They seem to forget there's a little thing called inflation that causes the costs of everything to go up - of course, that will also apply to maintenance and replacement of components within the HOA common areas.

If your community wants a pool, I think you'll need to educate them on the pros and cons, so if they decide this is what they want, they'll have to be willing to pay for it. Getting installation estimates is a good start, but you might also want to talk to HOA board members in other communities with a pool - see what their experiences are and whether you're willing to put up with the same issues.
MarkM19
(Texas)

Posts:85


06/27/2018 1:40 PM  
Erin,
As an Ex Board member all I can tell you is adding a Pool to your existing board duties will triple you troubles. You can see all the post on this site and that is a small sample of what all the other board members are having around the country that have not found this great site.

Someone mentioned having the members who keep asking for this do the groundwork of putting together a RFP for the Pool. It will almost certainly come back full of holes of things they did not consider. Send them back with more work to due to get it in order. This will take them months and they will see just how hard your job is. Then once they get around if they ever follow up and do it, the price will be more than they ever thought. They will also need to get quotes from the reserve study analyst for all the new components. Then they will have to try and sell it to your community.


Bottom line many board members would probably signup for a dreaded disease than adding a pool. Just kidding about the disease thing but I hope you get the point.
KerryL1
(California)

Posts:5656


06/27/2018 3:14 PM  
Excellent reply, Mark, to let those who want it bring back estimates for the Board to review.
JohnC46
(South Carolina)

Posts:7695


06/27/2018 3:32 PM  
Posted By MarkM19 on 06/27/2018 1:40 PM
Erin,
As an Ex Board member all I can tell you is adding a Pool to your existing board duties will triple you troubles. You can see all the post on this site and that is a small sample of what all the other board members are having around the country that have not found this great site.

Someone mentioned having the members who keep asking for this do the groundwork of putting together a RFP for the Pool. It will almost certainly come back full of holes of things they did not consider. Send them back with more work to due to get it in order. This will take them months and they will see just how hard your job is. Then once they get around if they ever follow up and do it, the price will be more than they ever thought. They will also need to get quotes from the reserve study analyst for all the new components. Then they will have to try and sell it to your community.


Bottom line many board members would probably signup for a dreaded disease than adding a pool. Just kidding about the disease thing but I hope you get the point.




Good suggestions. Place the burden on these wanting a pool. Appoint a Pool Advisory Committee, reporting directly to the BOD.

We have a BOD Member that wants to replace our pine straw much with another much. We asked him to get us a quote on the job......LOL
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